Cecilia is one the two winners of Charcutepalooza, check out her blog, via One Vanilla Bean.

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The economy struggled but cooking and writing about food sure didn’t! My colleague Emilia and I decided to have a look at the most popular—or most viewed is perhaps the better phrase—posts from this site this year. By far the most exciting blog event of the year was Cathy Barrow‘s and Kim Foster‘s Charcutepalooza. What an amazing thing happened, and all because of that catchy hashtag on Twitter. This would not have happened without Twitter. Congrats to all who participated and who pushed themselves to cook in unfamiliar and often difficult ways! Special congrats to Cecilia, who blogs at One Vanilla Bean, and Peter, who blogs at Cookblog, as the two year’s end finalists. Good luck to you both! Top ruhlman.com posts from 2011, in no particular order: Stock Convictions & Stock Clarifications In which I Read On »

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During a recent phone call with the excellent Elise of simplyrecipes, Elise wished aloud that I would address the nitrite issue directly.  “Trader Joe’s carries it!  Go look.  Is there one near you?” Indeed there is, and indeed they sell at least two products pitching themselves as a “healthier” bacon because they don’t add sodium nitrite. This is as odious as those sugar laden granola bars trumpeting “No Fat!” on their label—food marketers preying on a confused consumer who has been taught to fear food because of harmful additives (such as the recent, apparently genuine, Red Dye 40 warnings). Full disclosure if you don’t already know: I am a vocal bacon advocate, and one of my books, Charcuterie, relies on sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate for many of its recipes to cure foods such as Read On »

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I’ve been learning from the hog all week it seems. It just keeps giving.  Making salami, curing all parts.  Tenderloin and loin and coppa.  I’ve made a lot of fresh sausage and the headcheese is underway, the last of the hams are coming off the cure. Including this one, a portion of the ham, from the culo, stuffed into the pig’s bladder, which James and I blew up to dry earlier in the week.  Once it had dried in its expanded shape, I reconstituted it in water, cut it open, and sewed up the salted ham inside.  I’ll do my best to tie it up neatly so that it will hang well. I’ll keep an eye on it, but figure it will cure in about 6 months. What a wonder the pig continues to be. Read On »

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On Saturday I picked up a hog from the North Union Farmers Market, about 330 pounds with the head and some other requested parts. “They’re big, long and slippery,” James had told us.  Just getting each half into the back of our jeep was an effort.  The first step was to break the pig down for salumi into its three main sections just so we could store the creature in a friend’s walk-in: shoulder, middle and ham.  Then back to work all day Sunday to break it all down into salumi cuts and sausage.  It took about six of us five hours to bone out the whole hog, isolate the muscles for curing, get everything on the salt and get the first of the salamis stuffed and hanging, about 20 pounds of it. And still Read On »

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