I’ve been in LA on an entertainment project and to see the opening of my friend and collaborator Richard LaGravenese‘s new movie Beautiful Creatures. I’d never been to an opening before. But quiche has been on my mind, so I’ve been using travel time to work on some variations of this infinitely variable fat custard tart. If I had time I’d head to Bouchon in Beverly Hills, which makes perfect quiche. Bouchon, and working on that book, is where I learned that, while America was taught to make quiche in premade pie shells, this deprives the quiche of its true greatness: depth. In order to achieve that voluptuous texture, it has be about two inches thick. For this, you need to have a ring. When I told this to my partner in tools, Mac Dalton, Read On »

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Photos by donna [I'm on a blog break from 5/17 through 5/31, so I'm putting up favorite food posts from the archives, this one on quiche published last July] On Wednesday I flew to Washington to make a quiche at the restaurant Proof for a segment on “All Things Considered” with one of the show’s new hosts, Guy Raz.  Guy said he read the Slate review of the book, which called my book Ratio “fascinating and pompous,” and was intrigued.  So he and his producer, Phil Harrel, requested a dish that combined two ratios.  Quiche immediately came to mind, using both the 3-2-1 pie dough ratio (I’ve lost track of the number of people who have written to thank me for getting them over their fear of pie dough) and the custard ratio (2 parts Read On »

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UPDATE Tuesday, 12/4/13: We are working to fulfill orders placed before 12 a.m. beyond the eastern time zone. Thanks for the enthusiastic embrace cyber Monday. So grateful for everyone’s excitement. Fifty percent off all Dalton-Ruhlman cooking tools for today only: use the code word gobble at checkout. Hard to believe it’s been three years since my friend Mac Dalton and I introduced a small line of cooking tools. They’ve gotten kudos from chefs such as David Kinch and Jonathon Sawyer to Martha herself (she actually placed an order through my site). We haven’t advertised these things, we haven’t done any merchandising, because, well, that work gives me a headache, just not my thing, and there’s too much fun stuff to do, like actually making things. That’s what I love. To promote these tools, which I Read On »

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The first table I ever waited on would comprise two serious chefs, Richard Czack and CIA prez Ferdinand Metz, and the parents of a seminal American chef. It was in the St. Andrew’s restaurant at the Culinary Institute of America and it is forever linked in my mind with two similar drinks, the Sea Breeze and the Madras. The following is from the book that forever altered my course: Chef Czack did not look like a chef—balding, glasses, slight of frame; I didn’t know his age but he seemed elderly. His voice was nasal, fussy. He looked and sounded more like an accountant’s clerk. But Chef Czack was in fact a certified master chef and I was excited to be serving him and his guests, Mr. and Mrs. Forgione, parents of celebrity chef Larry, and Read On »

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