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I’m meeting with my editor from Little, Brown at the end of the week to run through ideas for the next cookbook (which I claimed I wouldn’t write … so sue me; perhaps it’s an illness). But I honestly don’t know what to explore. So I’m coming here for ideas. Of course, I always have teaching in mind when I write a cookbook, teaching myself, first and foremost. But I’d like to put the question out to home cooks and chefs alike. What book is most necessary, what cookbook doesn’t yet exist? Sous vide is ever on my mind, but I don’t know if that’s the right thing to do. Also, there are now several good books out there on the subject from people who have more experience than I. Modernist Cuisine Made Easy, sous vide Read On »

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Fish-Heads@1020

  I’m finishing up the third of four technique books this week, then giving myself an end-of-summer break. I’ll be back September 2nd. In the meantime, have a look at the best gone fishing essay of the year by NYTimes reporter C.J. Chivers. Enjoy your summer before it’s all gone!   If you liked this post, take a look at these links: My past summer posts on ceviche and fried chicken. Several weeks of summer still left, here are a few of Travel’s Best Summer Foods. Our favorite ice cream splurge Columbus’ own Jeni’s ice cream, which now has various locations around the United States. © 2014 Michael Ruhlman. Photo © 2014 Donna Turner Ruhlman. All rights reserved.  

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I published this last year in the Huffington Post on September 24, 2012, and it got such a strong response, I’m reposting it. Also I’m under the gun for two major book projects and two freelance assignments all due at once for some reason, not to mention sundry book promo interviews; I guess summer is over and fall is officially here. Sigh.—M.R. The Importance of Food? I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately, and not least of all because I’ve always strived to distance myself from the pigeonhole called “food writer.” Food is important, obviously. If we don’t have it, we die. Writing about something so important should need no justification. And yet if I were called, say, an “environmental journalist,” wouldn’t that sound somehow more substantial, more serious than being a “food writer”? Read On »

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Last election, I put up a big “Vote Obama” post in light of what I considered to be eight disastrous years of Bush, unnecessary war, and an economy that was going to take well more than four years to fix. I was at first surprised by some of the angry comments I got. A reader named Art wrote, “You’re a consommate [sic] chef. Leave it at that. Keep your friggin’ political opinions to yourself,” followed two minutes later by Joe: “Because you can cook, you can tell me for whom I’m to cast my vote? I don’t think so. Keep it in the kitchen—not the voting booth.” My response was more or less, “This site is my fucking yard and I can put up whatever sign I want.” And this led to more comments, pro Read On »

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Ever since I read Anne Patchett’s The Getaway Car, a short memoir on writing, I’ve wanted to write my own Kindle Single, a venue for fiction and nonfiction that’s longer than a magazine story but shorter than a book. (The NYTimes reviewed the singles here.) Any device running Android or iTunes can read Kindle books and Kindle Singles by downloading the free Kindle app. I’ve bought more Kindle books this year for my iPad than I have in the past five years in hardcover or paperback. I love to read on my iPad, and on my iPhone. So here’s my entree into exclusively digital space. I hope you’ll have a look. It’s a short memoir (10K words or about 35 manuscript pages), on how I got to where I am, a writer of food and Read On »

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