I’ve been fascinated by the digital world and the way it’s shaping not only the way content is spread through our culture but the content itself. I was eager to embrace blogging, thanks to Meg Hourihan and her husband. I’ve created two innovative cooking apps for smart phones, Ratio and Bread Baking Basics, with the hopes of making cooking easier and more fun for people—and there’s more to come, thanks to Will Turnage. I hope to introduce a top-secret “e-project” in the fall. One of the things I’m most excited about is the fact that the new media gives more control to the people who make things and takes away some of the power from the companies that once managed and distributed what other people made. This has beneficial and also dangerous repercussions, but I look at Read On »

Share

In the headlong rush to turn everything into an app, we have created amazing apps (shazam is truly amazing) and ridiculous apps (won’t name names). The publishers of cookbooks and chefs are among them.  Some publishers (S&S, my last publisher) are not entering the market; smaller more agile ones are (Chronicle, by chance publishing my next book). But what makes a valuable app? Since teaming up with Will Turnage, VP of technology and invention for the digital media firm R/GA, I’ve been creating apps for the iPad and smartphones and so have been thinking about how to proceed.  They take a lot of time and work and so far, return on investment is spotty (except in the games department). My goal is to create only apps that take unique advantage of the technology available.  Therefore, Read On »

Share