Mushrooms-1

We have a wonderful mushroom grower at our farmers’ market and as mushrooms are one of Donna’s favorite foods, I try to cook them as often as possible. (The above photo by Donna shows shiitake and sliced lion’s mane mushrooms.) But a lot of people ask me the best way to cook them. While there’s no one single right way, my preferred method is a high-heat sear followed by a deglazing with white wine, then adding butter and finishing over low heat. This goes back to my days as a cook at Sans Souci in Cleveland, where I worked only briefly. But the executive chef there was Claude Rodier, who had trained under French chef Roger Vergé. He told me the above—get the pan super hot; sear them to get color, which means flavor; then Read On »

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FM-comp-2014

  I’m finally home for a spell, long enough to plan out meals from my farmers’ market or, more precisely, growers’ market, and I was eager to see what was available this early in the season and after an uncommonly long, cold winter. Thanks to greenhouses there were plenty of greens, all kinds of them—kale, tatsoi, pea shoots, spinach, beet greens, basil. We have good local cheese makers so I picked up some sheep’s milk cheese and chèvre. Two dozen eggs, of course. Jason from Tea Hill Farms said, “Been so cold the chickens just don’t want to grow.” His chickens were just over two pounds and I bought a couple of them. They are so pristine, with firm, taut skin, they seem a different species from the ones in the grocery store. I bought oats and grits Read On »

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carrot

I’m on the road today, flying home at long last after my West Coast EGG book tour, so I’ve asked my friend Michelle of Nom Nom Paleo for a guest post and recipe from her dynamic new book while I recover. Thanks, Michelle!—M.R.   Carrot and Cardamom Soup Nothing signals springtime like a bowl of sunshine-orange soup. And surprise: it’s paleo-friendly to boot! After all, paleo’s not about deprivation, eating tons of meat, or simply recreating grain-free versions of your favorite comfort foods. Many dishes that rely on seasonal bounty are naturally paleo-friendly, just like this one from our new cookbook, Nom Nom Paleo: Food For Humans. 1 tablespoon coconut oil 2 large leeks, white and light green ends only, cleaned, trimmed, and thinly sliced Kosher salt 1½ pounds large carrots, peeled and cut into Read On »

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Lisa Ludwinski, 29, is a baker and cook living in Ferndale, Michigan. She recently returned to the Great Lakes State after a six-year stint eating bagels, nannying, and mixing many pounds of cookie dough in Brooklyn, finishing with stints at Momofuku Milk Bar and Four and Twenty Blackbirds. Now she is the owner of Sister Pie, a from-scratch home bakery serving the Detroit area via the Facebook page, and aims to celebrate the seasons with pie and other sweets through unique interpretations and natural ingredients. For now, she’s able to bake pies from home for sale under Michigan’s Cottage Food Law, but her goal is to open a full-service breakfast/lunch/pie shop. Here she offers her take on one of my favorite pies. I like to make a lattice top, which allows all of the moisture to escape Read On »

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A delicious spring treat for all and here are a few recipes for them, via WSJ.

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