Michael has been traveling all around the United States promoting his new book Ruhlman’s Twenty.  Yesterday he had a long day in New York City where he appeared on the Martha Stewart Show.  Michael sends his apologies, as he is nursing a wicked hangover.  He returns to Cleveland today and will be appearing at the Fabulous Food Show this weekend.  Please enjoy this favorite post of mine on how to Make Brioche.  This post reminds you to begin preparing for the holiday season, which is quickly approaching. Original Post Date: November 30, 2010 December is the month for making brioche at home. It’s the great holiday bread.  Though calling it bread doesn’t do it justice.  Good brioche is like a cross between bread and cake.  Hell, it’s really cake sneaking in as bread. Nothing better on Read On »

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In honor of this month’s #charcutepalooza challenge over at Mrs. Wheelbarrow, I’m reposting this soppressata recipe from a couple years back. Wishing all who take up the challenge well. Happy curing! While David Lebovitz considers molecular gastronomy and  The Alinea Cookbook in a long and thoughtful post today (he approaches with great skepticism, as he’s a traditionalist at heart, and leaves with appreciation having come back round to where he’d begun but by a whole new route), I would like to consider some of the oldest molecular gastronomical magic known to man.  Combining ground pork and salt and seasonings, introducing to it some microscopic creatures, and waiting for it to dry a little, to achieve a tangy flavorful sausage that has never gone above room temperature. In December, a few of us went in on a pig.  One of the Read On »

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  These are some of the pix we didn’t use in the new book, Ruhlman’s Twenty, and I wanted to share them because they make me hungry for pork belly. But when I sat down simply to mention this dish, Crispy Pork Belly with Miso-Caramel Glaze, it surprised me with all the lessons it has wrapped up in it. First of all, it’s a delicious dish (I was delighted that Rob Misfud, in his review of the book in Toronto’s Globe and Mail, tried it and loved it—while it’s not difficult, it’s more involved than most of the other recipes in the book).  But go below the deliciousness and you will see it’s a lesson in braising, in understanding the nature of pork skin, of the power of sugar, of using a definitively sweet ingredient in a Read On »

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Davis Lebovitz writes about making chocolate ice cream from Jeni’s Splendid ice Cream at Home cookbook, via David Lebovitz.

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  Even James, the guy who handed me a bag of 20 pig ears, gave me a funny look.  “What do you do with ‘em?” It’s not obvious, even to farmers, not in America. It wasn’t obvious to me till I had my first one several years ago at Michael Symon’s Lola, fried crispy on the outside, gelatinous and chewy on the inside, their richness offset by the sweet-sour heat of pickled chillis. Michael said he’d had a similar reaction when he’d first had one from Mario Batali. Where did Mario first have them? “The ears were a prized part of eating whole suckling pigs on weekend lunches in Segovia, Spain, near where we lived in Madrid throughout high school,” he said in an email yesterday. “I’ve  lived for ears and cheeks ever since!” How Read On »

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