Photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman Long enamored of black and white, my wife and collaborator has been working on a series of food shots featuring not food so much as the color of food. If you like her work, let her know or have a look at her gallery at ruhlmanphotography.com. I’m on vacation from now until Monday, April 4.  Until then, check back in here every other weekday for another of Donna’s photos. As ever, I’m grateful to all who come to this site, especially those who comment and keep the conversation lively! Thank you! Want more food writing? Have a look at some of my books: For deep forays into the world of professional cooking, my “Of A Chef” series, The Making of a Chef, The Soul of a Chef, and The Reach Read On »

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Biscotti is the perfect accompaniment mid-morning when I’m into my fifth or sixth cup of coffee.  I drink coffee all morning long and I’m able to do so because I don’t use one of those horrible drip machines, but rather what I think of as my personal 1956 Lincoln Continental of a coffee machine. The problem has always been that I’ve never really liked biscotti.  Maybe because I’ve only ever had the stuff that comes in a gift basket from Gallucci’s (a store I adore).  Or the one time I tried to make it myself.  It was rock hard and tasteless, so I figured I’d done a perfect job. But a while back, someone asked for a biscotti recipe, perhaps even a ratio.  My able colleague Emilia Juocys was intrigued and so recently set to Read On »

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I’ve always loved B&W photographs because they seem to say, “I am timeless, I need no pretty colors to attract—I am edgy.” With the age of digital also came the not having to choose between B&W and color film. This is truly a great thing, but you can’t just push the “remove color” button to convert your digital color into a B&W and many people do. If you do that you’ll end up with a very flat looking photo—here’s an example form Michael’s book, Ratio: Do you see the difference? If you ever did any B&W printing in the darkroom you would for sure. I did 2 things— increased the contrast being careful not to push the highlights too far so they look hot and I also burned in the rim of the bowl because Read On »

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I’m thrilled to announce that Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking, has now been published at an enormously friendly price, in pocket-friendly flexibility. That wickedly smart television personality, author and speaker, food guru Alton Brown, chose the book as one his Top 5 cookbooks, period: “This is a refreshing, illuminating and perhaps even revolutionary look at the relations that make food work,” he writes in The Wall Street Journal.  (Brown has a new book out next month, Good Eats: The Middle Years.) My favorite review was in Slate, in which Jennifer Reese asserts that Ratio is a “fascinating and pompous new book.”  Who the hell is Jennifer Reese?! NPR reporter Guy Raz read Reese’s skeptical but ultimately won-over verdict and did this piece for All Things Considered. If you’re new to Read On »

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At last, thanks entirely to app developer, marketing genius and avid cook, Will Turnage, and graphic designer Leah McCombe, the Ratio smart phone application can be downloaded by those who use android devices! Thank you Will and Leah. Android users, scan this QR or click the link above.  Let me know in comments if you have any problems! For those who don’t know what Ratio is or does, watch the demo below. The Ratio app is a cooking tool, a calculator of ingredients for 30 different fundamentals, from cake and muffin batters to bread doughs to vinaigrettes, to sausages and brine. I find it invaluable.  If I just need a couple cups of brine, I plug in the amount I want and it calculates the salt for me.  Same for if I have 28 ounces Read On »

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