Introducing the first of a new series of cooking videos on technique, though admittedly this one focuses on an actual Le Creuset piece, the cocotte. I love these little dishes. They’re great to cook in and great to serve in. I’m dying to do a little snail potpie in them. In this video, though, I’m cooking my favorite ingredient, the egg. How many ways can this little miracle of nutrition and economy be brought to ethereal heights of soul-satisfying deliciousness? Enough to fill a book or ten (wait for mine, coming in April). Here, I’m going with perhaps the easiest way of all to cook an egg, baked in an enclosed vessel. There are three different terms applied to eggs cooked in an oven. The second, after baked, is coddled: covered and baked in a Read On »

Share

As I mentioned today over in Huffington Post’s new food pages, I once used to purchase the Knorr powdered mix for Alfredo sauce.  This is almost like buying dehydrated water.  Fettuccine Alfredo is the world’s easiest cream sauce, and it’s also one of the best. In my opinion, the quality of the dish is dependent on the cheese, good Parmigiano-Reggiano.  If you don’t have that, make something else.  The traditional Italian Alfredo doesn’t use cream but I think the cream is essential for distributing the cheese.  I also feel that dried pasta is too heavy for this—this dish calls for fresh pasta.  Best to make it yourself, but good fresh pasta is available at most grocery stores now.  This dish comes together fast—the hardest part about it waiting for the water to boil. Fettucini Alfredo Read On »

Share