Pimm's-Cup

When I first posted this, a year ago in May, I was dreaming of warm weather. Now it’s the end of August, summer winding down, so wanted to re-post this most excellent warm summer evening cocktail, during the season in which it should be enjoyed. —M.R.   It’s 45 goddam degrees as I write this—morning but it’s only supposed to go up 6 more degrees by midday, and I am so tired of this cold gloomy weather I’ve decided to offer one of the great warm-weather libations, the Pimm’s Cup. It was downright hot last week, and the lilacs and dogwood are in bloom, so I make today’s Friday cocktail a harbinger of the warm weather to come. And for those of you who live where’s it’s already hot. My first encounter with Pimm’s Cup Read On »

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Deviled egg with smoked salmon and dill on a cucumber wheel. Photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman.

  Reposting on Deviled Egg strategies (and how to make perfect hard-cooked eggs). At an event to promote my new book on the mighty egg, I did a demo of some simple egg dishes with my friend and Cleveland chef, Doug Katz. He had prepared deviled eggs ahead of time, and I was struck by his decision to cut the eggs through their equator rather than lengthwise. He then sliced off some of the white at the bottom so that the eggs rested flat in a large tray. What a brilliant idea! Why hadn’t I thought of this? My only problem with deviled eggs is that I love them so much; but, because they’re so big, I can eat only so many. Doug came up with a solution: Removing a chunk of the white means Read On »

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A great summer treat, halibut ceviche. Photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman.

                                  I’ve been on the road a lot for a new book and so haven’t been able to post as usual. Offering here a repost of ceviche because when it’s hot, there’s no better appetizer, hors d’oeuvres, or even main course as a cool, acidic, spicy ceviche. And it’s so easy, nourishing, and refreshing, it’s something I make often in the summer. My favorite fish to use are snapper and grouper, which are usually easily available. I’d love to hear in comments what other fish people like to use in ceviche.—MR. One of the lucky perks about being an independent writer is that I can occasionally entertain invitations to exotic locales on someone else’s dime. Not long ago I Read On »

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A post from my friend Carri in Alaska (it’s about more than just fish). Above, “the family that fishes together”—Carri’s husband John and their girls laugh between sets, salmon fishing in Bristol Bay.–M.R.   By Carri Thurman In a recent New York Times article that went viral, Paul Greenberg laid out three simple rules for eating seafood, one of which is to eat American seafood. I was happy to hear that since it is a subject that has become near and dear to me in a very surprising way. When first I stumbled into Homer, Alaska, on a sunny spring day 30 years ago, the fact that this was a “fishing” town had completely escaped me. It wasn’t until I was drinking a beer at the Salty Dawg Saloon on my first night (conveniently located right across the street Read On »

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Mint-Julip-2

The first shoots of mint have sprung through the soil as if sensing the approach of the Kentucky Derby. The sun is out here in Cleveland, the birds are chirping, and the Browns made sensible draft choices.  All of which call for a mint julep this weekend. In my first post on this drink several springs ago, I served a somewhat unconventional julep and was roundly taken to task for it (no crushed ice? in a glass?). Deservedly. So herewith an almost traditional version, which is simply mint leaves, muddled with sugar, and bourbon, served over crushed ice in a silver cup. My only variation is for serving multiple juleps. A great strategy if you’ve invited people for Derby Day. Some may find the verdant hue unnerving but it’s worth it for the clean mint flavor Read On »

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