Roast-Turkey-done10

It’s the annual nationwide freak-out. That damned turkey! So many questions, so much uncertainty! I hope this goes a little ways toward easing your mind if you are among the turkey afflicted. Of course, a detailed recipe and process shots are in my latest book, Ruhlman’s How to Roast. For the last couple of years I’ve recommended a roast-braise hybrid. This year a straightforward roast, from the book. Publishers Weekly published a full-on version (see below). Here I just want to go through the basics. You must have good turkey stock on hand, which is easy to do, but you can also buy low-sodium organic broth as well. Stuff the cavity full of onions and lemon and carrots and celery to keep hot air from circulating in the bird’s cavity and overcooking the breast. Truss Read On »

Share
Roasted-root-vegs

  Two reasons to celebrate today: the publication of the first in my series of technique books, How to Roast, and the end of the Hachette-Amazon book pricing war. Presumably Amazon will no longer hide my books, or those by other authors at Little, Brown or any of the six houses Hachette runs. (They’ve just placed an order, my publisher tells me, so they should have them next week; till then, if you want to purchase do so through indies or B&N links below.) And the way to celebrate is to give away signed copies of the book! I will be giving away FIVE copies to randomly chosen commenters. You must in the comments tell me either your favorite food to roast or, if it is chicken (my fave), what your favorite side dish is to Read On »

Share
Stock-Mise-en-place

I’ve posted this before and I’m posting it again earlier this year. Thanksgiving is two weeks from this Thursday so if you have time, make some fresh turkey stock now and freeze it, or make it up to five or six days before Thanksgiving. It may be the most critical element of the Thanksgiving meal—the basis for a great gravy, of course, but it can also moisten the dressing and be used to keep the quick-to-cool sliced breast hot and moist. To make the stock I roast drumsticks, wings, and necks. (I read in the Times that the venerable Jacques Pépin picks the meat off the neck of the turkey and adds it to the gravy. I might try that this year.) Roasting them will give your stock a nice flavor. All that golden-brown roasted skin Read On »

Share
Eggnog-2009

I am traveling once again, but when I arrive back home I’ll be making my aged eggnog in preparation for the holidays. I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I do. -MR   Plan ahead! Not long after I began this blog in 2006, I wrote about and made aged eggnog upon reading about it at CHOW. Two years later Donna photographed it. A year after that, we finished the batch. It was a little funky and that was part of its deliciousness. I’m writing about it now so that you can, if you plan ahead, make it this weekend or next, for this holiday season, and the next, and, if you have the discipline, for December 2016. It needs at least 30 days for the aged flavor and for the alcohol to take care Read On »

Share
Butternut-squah-soup

When I arrived at Cleveland Airport this morning, I found a tweet from @nancypantscan (who has the coolest Twitter icon—I can never stop staring and marveling at it!), who said this soup, previously posted, is always a hit, and even converted her I-don’t-like-squash-soup bro-in-law. As the weather is getting chilly all the way down to my mom’s condo in West Palm, there is no better soup to put on your menu this week. I will be eating at some sweet spots here in NYC but even hope to have at least one cozy night at home, and this is the perfect dish for a tiny NYC kitchen, along with a good baguette. When I made the above soup, I took some extra time to clean and sauté the seeds in some butter for a crunchy garnish. Fresh Read On »

Share