When my old friend from high school, Mac Dalton, and I launched a small line of products in December 2010, I called it an experiment. The experiment worked, but not perfectly. The products, while of superlative quality, were nonetheless more expensive than we wanted them to be. I’m thrilled to announce that we’ve now cleared a threshold that has allowed us to restock our warehouse in enough quantity to lower the prices to what we’ve always wanted them to be. This means, for instance, that our beloved Badass Perforated (aka Egg) Spoon, which had been $33, is now $19.95. The big bundle of spoons and paddles (above), once $89 is now $59.95. We hope you’ll have a look at the new catalog, tell friends via Facebook, let me know on Twitter, or, better still, leave subtle hints Read On »

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So here’s the kind of Mom my wife and collaborator, Donna, is. On Saturday, at 5:30 she had just showered and was getting ready for a 6:30 party when her 17-year-old daughter asks if she, Donna, can take her to get that smart phone upgrade as hers, daughter’s, is broken. The teenaged daughter is not the most appreciative member of homo sapiens, remember, and Donna would not be unreasonable to say “I’m not dressed and we’re going out soon; this can wait till tomorrow,” but instead, she says, “Sure, hon, but we have to hurry.” Here’s the kind of wife Donna is. For Mother’s Day a few years ago, I bought her a really good wheelbarrow. She was ecstatic, and made googly eyes at me. I felt so lucky. A wheelbarrow! Mom’s Day is important. Read On »

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We have that special separation tool for you, the Badass Perforated Egg Spoon.

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The All-Strains are cotton, reusable straining cloths for all straining needs.  No reason to keep buying cheesecloth. 

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ABC has a regular feature called “Made in America,” which praises small businesses that make goods here. Advertisers have found that “Made in the USA” is a powerful marketing device. I myself have a feel-good response to anything made in this country. But what does it really mean? How critical is it? Steve Jobs said point-blank, and to the president, about manufacturing Apple products in China, “Those jobs are gone and they aren’t coming back.” Full stop. (Anyone interested in business and innovation, btw, should read Walter Isaacson’s riveting biography of Jobs.) New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman makes the point regularly that the way to energize the U.S. economy is not by creating legions of workers who can put a glass screen onto an iPad faster and cheaper than they can in China, but Read On »

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