Michael has been traveling all around the United States promoting his new book Ruhlman’s Twenty.  Yesterday he had a long day in New York City where he appeared on the Martha Stewart Show.  Michael sends his apologies, as he is nursing a wicked hangover.  He returns to Cleveland today and will be appearing at the Fabulous Food Show this weekend.  Please enjoy this favorite post of mine on how to Make Brioche.  This post reminds you to begin preparing for the holiday season, which is quickly approaching. Original Post Date: November 30, 2010 December is the month for making brioche at home. It’s the great holiday bread.  Though calling it bread doesn’t do it justice.  Good brioche is like a cross between bread and cake.  Hell, it’s really cake sneaking in as bread. Nothing better on Read On »

Share

My second pick for innovative use of veal stock came in from Marc Barringer, Chef/Hopsitality Director, St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, Grosse Pointe Woods and  Food Service Director, Lost Lake Scout Reservation, Freeman Twp., Michigan. He’s also a freelance writer, innovative cook and classic jack-of-all-trades in the best cooks tradition (still a school crossing guard! God bless him!).  Veal stock is one of the great preparations of the kitchen that can elevate everyone’s cooking, and someone on twitter asked me what you could do with it. It lead to a lot of great ideas, in addition to the traditional uses for making sauces and enriching braises. Read the story of how Marc came up with bread—it’s classic innovation from the restaurant kitchen.  I love it.  And I love the bread.  Donna loves the bread. James loves the bread. Read On »

Share

December is the month for making brioche at home. It’s the great holiday bread.  Though calling it bread doesn’t do it justice.  Good brioche is like a cross between bread and cake.  Hell, it’s really cake sneaking in as bread. Nothing better on Christmas morning. It’s a celebratory bread—rich with butter and eggs.  Toast it and eat it with butter. Toast it and eat it with foie gras. It makes extraordinary and delicate croutons.  Nothing makes better French toast.  And it’s fabulous on its own, straight out of the oven. I made it once for my daughter Addison.  When she asked for a repeat performance, I wrote the below recipe so that she could make it on her own. She first made it when she was eleven, four years ago, and she still makes it Read On »

Share

Do we need a recipe for Chipotle-Corn Ciabatta?  I’m in the process of developing bread recipes, all kinds, working with sourdough, whole grain, the powerfully flavored rye, but I began with some basic flavored breads. This is one of my favorites because I am crazy for chipotles, and am devoted to corn, which goes great with chipotles.  Cilantro on top of that?  Good for color but optional if cilantro tastes like soap to you but I love it. This is just the basic 5:3 bread ratio with flavors I love.  (For more on basic bread ratio, or any of my ratios, you can of course read this book.)  But really, you can flavor it any way you want to.  I like the ciabatta shape, Italian for slipper, a name marketed in Italy in the 1980s.  Read On »

Share