Its not just in the UK where radishes are gaining in popularity, but here in the US too; especially the autumn ones, via The Telegraph. 

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Last Saturday at our farmer’s market at Shaker Square in Cleveland, one of the farmers was selling fresh soy beans still on the stalk (above, photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman).  It’s a great way to sell them.  I don’t mind doing the picking of my own beans (he charged $3.50 for what amounted to a pound of soybeans). “They’d be a lot more expensive if I had to pick them,” he told me. These beans, often sold cooked as edamame (their Japanese name), are so good when you cook them yourself, a delicious nourishing snack or a great ingredient. To prepare the soy beans, simply boil them in their pods until they’re tender, then chill them in ice water or in plenty of continuously running cold water. They pop right out of the pod. You can Read On »

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What are the most special things we can cook? I contend the most special preparations are not those that are most difficult, time-consuming, or use the most expensive ingredients, but rather the ones that result in food we can’t buy. I can make bread, and it’s really good, and fun to bake and fills the house with a great aroma.  But it’s not going to be as good as the baguettes I can buy at On the Rise bakery. A preparation such as mayonnaise, however, that’s different. You can’t buy mayonnaise that’s as good as mayonnaise you make. It doesn’t exist. Potato chips are another such food. I like Lays potato chips just as I like Helmann’s mayonnaise, and on a Saturday afternoon, if I want a quick sandwich and chips, I’m glad to have Read On »

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When I introduced our offset basting tasting saucing spoons, we showed clips of my basting roast cauliflower (above, photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman), numerous people asked me how to I cooked the caulflower.  And just today, Ted Allen said in an email he’d roasted plenty of cauliflower but never thought to do it whole, loved the presentation it would make.  Indeed, it can be roasted cut or whole.  Cut cauliflower cooks faster and there’s a lot more surface that gets browned (it’s what I do when I forget to start the whole cauliflower in time).  But cooking it whole is easier, and it looks so cool while it’s roasting and does make a tantalizing presentation at the table.  Either way, roasted cauliflower is a great dish, either as a side dish to a bigger meal Read On »

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I’ve been finding amazing garlic at our farmer’s market, the skin thin and tight around the cloves, the cloves clustering around the hard core. (Why is only soft core garlic available in grocery stores?)  Garlic that is visibly juicy when you cut into it.  Garlic whose germ is small and white.  When I find garlic like this, I like to feature it, whether in tomato water pasta (this is a fabulous technique if you’ve got tons of tomatoes), plentiful and barely cooked; in a Caesar dressing, cooked only by the lemon juice; or minced and tossed with asparagus and olive oil then grilled. We did this last night at a friend’s, a boy’s night out, overlooking the Chragrin River Valley, humid-hazy as the sun set, playing with fire.  And a dinner consisting of nothing more than Read On »

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