I ran this photo by Donna a while ago, but came across it this weekend and love it so much I decided to put it back up. Just because. Want to see something even more beautiful? Watch this video, from Grant Achatz and the team at Alinea and Next, the restaurant that is now devoted to childhood. Anyone else tear up? It was the beaters that got me. (My colleague Emilia Juocys found it and put it in the Sidenotes here but it deserves to be featured.)

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Winners were chosen at random, but the ah-ha moments were so interesting and so vast, they deserve their own post, or maybe even a book!  Many thanks to all who offered their personal “Ah-Ha.”  And thank you Rob Levitt, of Chicago’s Butcher & Larder for suggesting this idea in the first place! Here are the winners of a signed copy of Ruhlman’s Twenty: 20 Techniques; 100 Recipes; A Cook’s Manifesto and their “Ah-Ha” moment: Ryan: My Ah-Ha moment came the first time I used a knife that wasn’t from a garage sale or Walmart. Before that moment cutting food (much less cooking it) was always a chore; something done because it had to be, not because I wanted to. But from the first moment I used a real knife instead of a cheap stamped commodity Read On »

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As I begin to travel this week to promote my new book, I want to give away five personalized signed copies. But I want something from you. An “ah-ha” moment. Earlier in the month, promoting my appearance at Butcher & Larder in Chicago, owner Rob Levitt asked people for just such a moment, a revelation, a moment when you tasted something, combined two uncommon ingredients, used a tool in a new way, that changed the way you saw food, the kitchen, cooking. I’ve had many, and they’re always a thrill. I write about one in the new book, the time my chef instructor at the CIA, Michael Pardus, tasted my cream of broccoli soup and said, “This is good. But I want you to take this back to your station and taste it again. Then I Read On »

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Last April, I wrote a post about leaving stock out on the stove top claiming that it would be safe to eat provided that you brought it to a simmer before eating. Indeed I’ve been doing this for a decade with no ill effects. On twitter and on the post itself, I received voluminous responses. One response, from a large-animal veterinarian, noted that it was entirely possible for heat-stable toxins, not bacteria, to persist, making the stock unsafe. I revised the post with the vet’s valid warnings with links to the CDC’s warnings on the particular bacteria. But the response was so strong, I suggested in an email to NYTimes food section editor Pete Wells, that this would be a great story.  I’ve left stock out on the stove top for up to three days Read On »

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I was cleaning out my iMovies and came across this quick clip my son James filmed a while ago. I’d just been to Bar Symon to break down a hog American style. Matt Harlan was the chef there (he’s now back at Lolita, front of the house) and the kitchen was huge; he had a hog ready and a big table to break it down on. I’d done it and written about it but needed to be able to teach someone else to do it.  And I needed to be sure my verbal descriptions were accurate. After we’d finished both sides, and Donna and I were packing to go, Matt, aka Chatty Matty, gave me a piece of their prepared pork skins.  His boss, Michael Symon, had picked up the technique from Paul Kahan, who Read On »

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