FINALLY!!! Ruhlman’s Twenty is back in full stock. The first 25,000 sold out within a few months of publication, so fast that Chronicle Books couldn’t push the reprint button fast enough. This delay, followed by a printing error, has kept the book unavailable for four months now! Killing me! But now it’s back in full force with one difference. People have begun to use it, and tweet successes, and facebook it. From Martha (on whom I developed immediate crush) to the Chicago Tribune to the LATimes, the reviews have been resounding. Here are some from amazon: The best review, was the very first, a video review by a woman named Becky, whom I don’t know but would very much like to meet! Others have written: I am a big fan of his books and his blog. Time and Read On »

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  Last night, on the Broad Stage with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, I spoke about connections of music and food, in between selections from Puccini, Rossini, de Falla and Schoenfield. When Rachel Fine, executive director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, first wrote to request that I speak, I honestly almost flat turned her down. I’m no music expert, and wasn’t sure what point it would serve. But she pressed, I became intrigued enough to give it some thought and was surprised to discover how many natural similarities there were and are, and perhaps most surprisingly of all to realize a couple of important musical metaphors had worked their way into my own writing without my being conscious of it. The first was my final meal at the French Laundry, having spent several weeks Read On »

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A combination of steaming and roasting an item under a mound of salt, via LA Times.

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Fried chicken, done right, is one of the best things to eat on earth. It’s all about the proportions—crunchiness: juiciness: chewiness: savoriness. And this ratio hits golden proportions with the wing, lots of crunchy peppery surface area and sweet succulent meat. The study of fried chicken began for me in 2007 during discussions, observations and eating with chef Dave Cruz at Ad Hoc in Yountville, CA, as we worked on the book Ad Hoc at Home. While Ad Hoc’s method of flour-buttermilk-flour is not unique, their trial and error experimentation with various methods (including sous vide), proved to them and to me, that this method is indeed superlative. That was 2007, and I’ve since fried a lot of chicken. My recipe is in Ruhlman’s Twenty. I think it’s better than the one in Ad Hoc (I Read On »

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I almost never “do” recipes. I’ve written a book that if anything is an anti-recipe book. I set out on this culinary journey in part because, as I wrote in Making of a Chef, I sensed that recipes were nothing more than a tease, that the real cooking lay beneath the recipes. This is not to say that recipes are bad. Say you made a really killer stir-fry and wanted to be able to do it over and over, or you wanted your best friend to give it a try, you’d want to follow a recipe. If you want to recreate a dish, you need a recipe. I could probably make a decent oatmeal raisin cookie just by figuring it out, but I’d feel better at least glancing at a few recipes. The whole of Read On »

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