I wrote this very same thing last year: for delicious turkey gravy on Thursday, make a quart of rich turkey stock today or tomorrow. Here’s what my plan is.  I’m roasting a chicken for dinner and I’ll also throw into the oven two fat turkey wings  and cook them till they look delicious enough to eat.  I’ll put them in a pan and cover them with water (I may add the chicken carcass—haven’t decided yet.  The wings I bought weigh about 3 pounds (and cost less than $4).  I’ll pour in at least that much water, probably more, enough to cover them by about an inch of water in a snug pan.  I’ll bring the water to a simmer, then put the pan uncovered in the oven set low, 180 degrees or so, overnight.  They Read On »

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Photos by Donna I published almost two years ago, at the end of summer—a chance email today thanking me for the technique.  So I thought let’s put it up again at the start of grilling season. I’m not always real quick on the uptake, but I eventually get around to the right way, and the right way for perfect (and safe) is to grind your own meat and make sure to include the right amount of fat (I don’t believe that the cut is that critical). Yes, I still buy ground beef occasionally but when I want to make a really good burger, I always grind the meat myself.  Why go to the trouble?  For a half a dozen reasons, all of them important. First and foremost: taste and texture.  When you grind your own, Read On »

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It’s the only way to redeem the catastrophe of the Chicken Caesar.  Wed it with pork belly that has been briefly cured, then gently poached in fat, cooled in fat, then sliced, breaded and deep-fried.  I want to say it again: Pork belly confit, deep-fried.  Oh, man it is soooo good. Following what I think is an extraordinary thread of comments on the Caesar Salad in America, for which I want to express huge thanks to those who took the time to write and argue; all of you help me to know what I think and I hope think better, and I am grateful—I humbly introduce … The Chicken Fried Pork Belly Caesar.  I didn’t do the croutons because of the crispy nature of the pork but Donna suggested that for a truly innovative interpretation, Read On »

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