Last summer when Donna and I traveled to Italy, our first meal happened to be at a lovely hotel and home of a great wine maker and his wife, who prepared us a feast that began with zucchini soup. It was zucchini season and so they featured it in three courses without apology, just an explanation. “It’s zucchini season.” The soup was so simple it inspired. Onion, water, and zucchini, seasoned with good oil and salt. This week, while I work in Key West, I’ll be posting some of my wife Donna’s favorite pix from last year. She likes this one for the way it shows off the power of back lighting. I like it because it brings our first meal in Italy back to me in its entirety. Other links you may like: My Read On »

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One pot meals are great for this cold winter they are easy to make and taste delicious, via NYT.

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Learn how to make crema de flor de calabaza or squash blossom soup, via Kitchen Konfidence.  

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Blogger Ree Drummond shares a great winter warming recipe for Tuscan bean soup, via The Pioneer Woman.

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  Funny.  The recipes people are pulled toward, desire, crave, are the most basic. Like Onion soup. Part of why I love people’s hunger for basic food is because there’s so much to learn from the simplest dishes. This recipe is from the new book, Ruhlman’s Twenty.  The new book attempts to distill cooking down to 20 fundamental techniques. Two of the techniques are not verbs but rather nouns: water and onion—two of the most powerful ingredients in your kitchen, rarely given the reverence they deserve. The soup deserves this high praise not only because it’s delicious and satisfying, but because it was borne out of economy. This is a peasant soup, made from onions, a scrap of old bread, some grated cheese, and water. Season with salt and whatever wine is on hand or some Read On »

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