One of my favorite things on earth to eat is a well made foie gras torchon. It’s a special preparation of foie gras, fat duck liver, that I first experienced at The French Laundry (the recipe is in The French Laundry Cookbook if you have it).  It’s a three day procedure and brings out the very best in the foie gras when done right.  The duck liver is deveined, typically soaked in milk and salt to remove residual blood, then seasoned and, traditionally, rolled up in a kitchen towel (a torchon, in French), poached, rerolled to compact it and chilled. It’s then eaten cold, a big fat slice of it, with some form of bread and a sweet-sour accompaniment.  The biggest producer of foie gras in the country, Hudson Valley Foie Gras, was making and Read On »

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Due to many natural disasters, prices of spices are increasing.  Read about 8 spices and why their yields are low, via Independent UK.

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How fast this summer is receding in my rear view mirror is reflected in the ciliantro that, for all my travel and busyiness, I have let go to seed. Yet there are glories even in being remiss–the fresh coriander seeds that lends so many savory preparations a huge jolt of flavor and crunch.  Fresh coriander seed makes a great garnish on rice, in salads, on meats, in sauces. I particulary love it roughly cracked and used liberally with black pepper on any grilled meat. If you grow your own, you can pick it when it’s still green, almost fruity and a little chewy with that same flavor burst. We’re ensconced now in an extraordinary big old house outside Great Barrington in western MA, preparing for the onslaught of a teaming brood, the entirety of Donna’s Read On »

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