Oyster blog

I’m back from a fascinating trip to Massachusetts, where I visited a hatchery on Duxbury Bay. It was only due to this trip that I thought about where oysters come from and realized I had no idea how they are born. Most oyster farmers buy oyster seed, which are oysters the size of pinheads but fully formed. I had to turn to Rowan Jacobsen’s 2007 book A Geography of Oysters for an explanation. He is more elegant than I will be here, as my previous post, Considering the Oyster, shows. (Oh, and I urge oyster lovers to visit his fabulous new site, Oysterater, which describes every oyster available in the country and what people say about them.) The above are Island Creek Oysters and I ate them on this floating barge in the middle of the bay. The oyster on the left is one Read On »

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empty-oyster-shell-2

I’m off today to the coast of Massachusetts to write a magazine story on oysters. I’m very excited as I’ve never been to an oyster farm. Oysters are truly among the most unique creatures we eat. But why do they inspire us so? Their gorgeous shells (above photo by Donna). An oyster is one of the few things we we eat that’s still alive. They express “terroir” the way wines do. The fact of wanting to eat this living, slippery organism is counterintuitive. And as a French writer proclaimed, “Eating an oyster is like kissing the sea on the lips!” In preparing for this story, I returned to Rowan Jacobsen’s 2007 book A Geography of Oysters and was reminded of what a talented writer Jacobsen is—dynamic and clear and engaging and informed and imaginative. If I Read On »

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Shumai-finished

Chrissy Camba (@chrissycamba) is the Owner/Chef of Maddy’s Dumpling House in Chicago. Shortly after graduating from Loyola University with a degree in biology, Chrissy fell in love with cooking. In a very “Sliding Doors” twist, she was asked to stage in a kitchen and later offered her first kitchen job. After many accolades, a Top Chef competition, and the passing of her bunny, Maddy, Chrissy started Maddy’s Dumpling House. Currently, Maddy’s Dumpling House “pops up” once a month around Chicago until Chrissy can find a permanent brick and mortar space to call home.  By Chrissy Camba Dumplings have been a part of my life since I can remember. I would find them floating in soups, looking like wrinkled brains, deep-fried in tight rolls filled with ground meat, steamed/fried/pan-fried racing around me on little metal carts that periodically stopped by Read On »

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A new sustainable seafood restaurant located in the heart of Chicago, check it out.

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It is cold outside and the best way to warm up is making a bowl of clam chowder from La Conner Brewing, via LA Times.

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