I’m so pleased with results of the cooked eggnog I wrote for the last post, I wanted to give an official tested recipe.  Don’t misunderstand me.  I’m a fan of raw egg eggnog, as well as aged-for-two-years raw eggnog. I don’t believe anyone should be afraid of eating raw egg (especially if you buy organic or well-raised eggs).  Raw yolk on raw ground beef is a delight, a kind of ready made sauce. I love a homemade mayo, a runny poached egg.  Indeed, raw or warm egg is one of the great pleasures of cooking and eating.  So here’s to lots of eggs in 2010—may more of them be laid by healthy happy chickens! But there are those who may be concerned or have reason not to take any chances.  There are also those who Read On »

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Last post on the astonishing versatility of five parts flour, three parts water.  First it was pizza (remember this awesome pizza?… hmm, maybe a bacon and egg pizza this weekend).  More recently, I made these delicious pretzels.  Same dough, different products. And here it is in yet another form. Every now and then, when I or Donna stop at On the Rise bakery, where Adam Gidlow and staff bake bread, bread, bread—the best baguette in the land, as far as I’m concerned—we pick up a loaf of sandwich bread, which young James calls “the most awesome bread ever.” Last time I was there, jealous of the light airy crust and soft kid-friendly texture, I asked Adam, “What makes it sandwich bread?” He said, “It’s the exact same dough as the baguette, but a longer ferment.  Read On »

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I wrote this very same thing last year: for delicious turkey gravy on Thursday, make a quart of rich turkey stock today or tomorrow. Here’s what my plan is.  I’m roasting a chicken for dinner and I’ll also throw into the oven two fat turkey wings  and cook them till they look delicious enough to eat.  I’ll put them in a pan and cover them with water (I may add the chicken carcass—haven’t decided yet.  The wings I bought weigh about 3 pounds (and cost less than $4).  I’ll pour in at least that much water, probably more, enough to cover them by about an inch of water in a snug pan.  I’ll bring the water to a simmer, then put the pan uncovered in the oven set low, 180 degrees or so, overnight.  They Read On »

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