Resolution for the year: cook.  Mark Bittman shares advice and recipes for becoming a cook in 2011, via NYT.

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The term “domestic” is linked to the female persona set by our culture.  Think about all the cooking, preserving, upkeep, and care you do throughout the day.   It is just about choice and living the way you want to live, via Grist.org

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We live in a time of unprecedented interest in, and care for, food and all the issues that surround its growing, harvesting, purveyance, and its cooking.  This interest happened because we were on the brink of losing good food altogether, with farmers disappearing and the masses abandoning the kitchen, handing over our farming to Monsanto and giving our most fundamental and exclusively human act, cooking, over to the ConAgras and McDonalds.  (ConAgra, one of our biggest food processors, is that name a joke on us?! Con, against, Agra, agriculuture—against agriculture! At least they’re open about it!) We only become reflective about something we’d previously taken for granted when it becomes imperiled. I’m not saying that rampant diabetes in teenagers, epidemic obesity, social fragmentation and alienation, nitrogen runoff in our rivers and oceans, oceans increasingly depleted Read On »

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I am lucky enough to live in a town where the local hardware store carries replacement electrical cords for old fashioned percolators.  The fact that mine crackles when I plug it in means it’s time to get to that store. And it reminded me of this post from nearly two years ago.  My love of perked coffee has not faltered, nor has my fierce desire to rid the world of the ridiculous automatic drip coffee maker, a sham perpetrated on an unthinking, convenience minded public. Photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman When my beloved General Electric 9-Cup Percolator, filched from my father’s house, gave out after 40 years of vigorous life, I got what I’m sure was a gift from heaven: another one (above).  Discovered on E-Bay, this one, manufactured in 1950, was all but unused.  Read On »

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As I’ve said before, the best things happen when you get carried away.  Two people who share this view are Diane Cu and Todd Porter, photographers and filmakers, aka whiteonricecouple.  Two weeks ago, at the BlogHer food conference in San Farancisco, they asked to film me talking, I’m still not sure why.  Diane said she wanted to film me thinking. I thought that was going to be kind of difficult. I’d just come from the concluding keynote panel with glutenfreegirl and orangette, two people I really admire, and had a few minutes before heading to a bacon curing demo orchestrated by Elise.   I’ve got no excuses other than the six cups of coffee before the panel. The book of which I speak, is Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, by Harvard Anthropologist Richard Wrangham. Read On »

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