When I’m planning a meal or going to the grocery store, I always check the USDA food pyramid to make sure my list is on track and ensure that I have a healthy lifestyle.  Don’t you? The USDA released Dietary Guidelines last week and while they’re more sensible than in years past, I honestly wonder, do they really do any good? Is it more helpful to suggest that people reduce sodium than to suggest they reduce the amount of processed food they eat—which would help on numerous levels, not just the salt issue. My belief about salt, this very essential rock we eat, is that if you don’t eat processed food, and are otherwise healthy, your body will automatically regulate the salt you desire. I don’t worry over salt. Remember when we were told that Read On »

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I’ve heard so many chefs say they look for cooks with “passion,” I just kind of accepted it without thinking. But I’ve long since stopped listening to this.  What does passion mean?  That you love to cook? That you work really hard? I have no idea, which is why I try not to use the word.  Thomas Keller agrees.  Speaking about this issue a while ago, he wanted people to use the word desire.  But I think there’s an even better word, one that describes Keller’s extraordinary success in the kitchen, and it’s a quality that will lead to success in any area of life. As ever, thanks here go to the extraordinary Diane Cu and Todd Porter, white on rice couple, who were inspired to shoot the above video in San Francisco this past Read On »

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Resolution for the year: cook.  Mark Bittman shares advice and recipes for becoming a cook in 2011, via NYT.

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The term “domestic” is linked to the female persona set by our culture.  Think about all the cooking, preserving, upkeep, and care you do throughout the day.   It is just about choice and living the way you want to live, via Grist.org

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We live in a time of unprecedented interest in, and care for, food and all the issues that surround its growing, harvesting, purveyance, and its cooking.  This interest happened because we were on the brink of losing good food altogether, with farmers disappearing and the masses abandoning the kitchen, handing over our farming to Monsanto and giving our most fundamental and exclusively human act, cooking, over to the ConAgras and McDonalds.  (ConAgra, one of our biggest food processors, is that name a joke on us?! Con, against, Agra, agriculuture—against agriculture! At least they’re open about it!) We only become reflective about something we’d previously taken for granted when it becomes imperiled. I’m not saying that rampant diabetes in teenagers, epidemic obesity, social fragmentation and alienation, nitrogen runoff in our rivers and oceans, oceans increasingly depleted Read On »

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