This is the last of the whiteonricecouple‘s video we did at the end of the BlogHer conference in San Francisco last fall. They were off the cuff experimental food and cooking editorials, and this one came on the tail of my linking Richard Wrangham’s contention that it was the cooking of food that gave us the calories we needed to make the leap from hominid to human and what it might have to say about our current state, having largely given up cooking in America for the past 60 years (that’s video here). This video has nothing to do with food, but it does have something to do with awareness, and that has everything to do with the kitchen. Of all the knowledge I’ve absorbed from Thomas Keller, perhaps the most important one of all Read On »

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On a lighter, more serious note, one of my true regrets. And nothing to do with food. Thank you, Todd & Diane the White on Rice Couple—we need to do a video on how to roast a chicken (seriously, that’s not a come on). If you liked this video interlude, check out these other posts: Watch the first Had Something to Say video. Need to laugh at a recipe take a look at Brain Cupcakes at They Draw and Cook Stay at Stove Dad found a great video on the Jellymongers, Bompas & Parr. Don’t laugh at them, they are great kitchen tools! The Spanker & Spanky © 2011 Michael Ruhlman. Video © 2011 White on Rice Couple. All rights reserved.

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When I’m planning a meal or going to the grocery store, I always check the USDA food pyramid to make sure my list is on track and ensure that I have a healthy lifestyle.  Don’t you? The USDA released Dietary Guidelines last week and while they’re more sensible than in years past, I honestly wonder, do they really do any good? Is it more helpful to suggest that people reduce sodium than to suggest they reduce the amount of processed food they eat—which would help on numerous levels, not just the salt issue. My belief about salt, this very essential rock we eat, is that if you don’t eat processed food, and are otherwise healthy, your body will automatically regulate the salt you desire. I don’t worry over salt. Remember when we were told that Read On »

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I’ve heard so many chefs say they look for cooks with “passion,” I just kind of accepted it without thinking. But I’ve long since stopped listening to this.  What does passion mean?  That you love to cook? That you work really hard? I have no idea, which is why I try not to use the word.  Thomas Keller agrees.  Speaking about this issue a while ago, he wanted people to use the word desire.  But I think there’s an even better word, one that describes Keller’s extraordinary success in the kitchen, and it’s a quality that will lead to success in any area of life. As ever, thanks here go to the extraordinary Diane Cu and Todd Porter, white on rice couple, who were inspired to shoot the above video in San Francisco this past Read On »

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Resolution for the year: cook.  Mark Bittman shares advice and recipes for becoming a cook in 2011, via NYT.

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