Nothing more to say (on this subject, anyway…). Thanks Todd and Diane for your amazing work and of course Amy Scattergood for her reason.   If you liked this post on Stupid Kitchen Tools, check out these other links: Todd and Diane’s first Had Something To Say video. Preview my collection of kitchen tools that include the spanker, bad ass egg spoon, all strain clothes, and more. To find other interesting products click over to OpenSky. It is an older post, but look at these off the wall kitchen gadgets. © 2012 Michael Ruhlman. Photo © 2012 Donna Turner-Ruhlman. All rights reserved

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I know what it was that set me off today. A random article, out of the blue, I shouldn’t even have read it. It referred to great food cooked with rendered fat as “early-grave food heaven.” Why do people say stupid things like this? Because the media bombards us with the simplistic message that Fat Is Bad For You, and it pisses me off. Why? Because it’s not true.  Fat is good for you.  Fat is good for your body.  I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. Fat doesn’t make you fat, EATING TOO MUCH MAKES YOU FAT! Eating every morsel of your mile high Cheesecake Factory plate is what makes you fat.  Eating a whole bag of Doritos is what makes you fat.  Eating when you’re not hungry makes you fat! To Read On »

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During a recent phone call with the excellent Elise of simplyrecipes, Elise wished aloud that I would address the nitrite issue directly.  “Trader Joe’s carries it!  Go look.  Is there one near you?” Indeed there is, and indeed they sell at least two products pitching themselves as a “healthier” bacon because they don’t add sodium nitrite. This is as odious as those sugar laden granola bars trumpeting “No Fat!” on their label—food marketers preying on a confused consumer who has been taught to fear food because of harmful additives (such as the recent, apparently genuine, Red Dye 40 warnings). Full disclosure if you don’t already know: I am a vocal bacon advocate, and one of my books, Charcuterie, relies on sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate for many of its recipes to cure foods such as Read On »

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This is the last of the whiteonricecouple‘s video we did at the end of the BlogHer conference in San Francisco last fall. They were off the cuff experimental food and cooking editorials, and this one came on the tail of my linking Richard Wrangham’s contention that it was the cooking of food that gave us the calories we needed to make the leap from hominid to human and what it might have to say about our current state, having largely given up cooking in America for the past 60 years (that’s video here). This video has nothing to do with food, but it does have something to do with awareness, and that has everything to do with the kitchen. Of all the knowledge I’ve absorbed from Thomas Keller, perhaps the most important one of all Read On »

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On a lighter, more serious note, one of my true regrets. And nothing to do with food. Thank you, Todd & Diane the White on Rice Couple—we need to do a video on how to roast a chicken (seriously, that’s not a come on). If you liked this video interlude, check out these other posts: Watch the first Had Something to Say video. Need to laugh at a recipe take a look at Brain Cupcakes at They Draw and Cook Stay at Stove Dad found a great video on the Jellymongers, Bompas & Parr. Don’t laugh at them, they are great kitchen tools! The Spanker & Spanky © 2011 Michael Ruhlman. Video © 2011 White on Rice Couple. All rights reserved.

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