This was my very first rant, originally published 7/6/06 here on megnut.com (Meg is back to blogging if you didn’t know, welcome back, Meg!).  I sat down at my desk having read the Bruni agony that warm summer morning and it just came out. Has anything changed…? This continual talk about the ethics of eating creatures that were once living is starting to get on my nerves. It’s not enough that those knuckleheads in Chicago and those sensitivos in California want to waste their time on the foie issue and the Whole Foods people figured out a cool marketing tool in playing to our arrogant anthropomorphist inclinations—giving lobsters spa treatment so we feel better about driving a knife through their skull. Brilliant. What’s next, no oysters? No sir—they’re alive! No more salmon roe—think of all Read On »

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Originally posted, 8/13/07 (alas, I have yet to rid America of this tragedy): Does anyone know who first put cooked chicken breast on a Caesar salad and called it a Chicken Caesar?  I wish I did.  I’ve been upset about this at least for two years now because I remember railing to Todd English and Ming Tsai about it as we traveled together for an erstwhile cooking show.  “The Chicken Caesar is an emblem of the mediocrity of American cuisine!” I would cry.  Ming would chuckle and turn up the volume on his iPod, and Todd more or less ignored me as a run-of-the-mill crank screaming into the nor’easter of American food culture. Or so I thought. Last week I had lunch at a Cheesecake Factory in Cleveland, and of course, there it was, Caesar Read On »

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I tried not to read Kim Severson’s New York Times article on the one-touch buttons on appliances at the International Home and Housewares show in Chicago.  You know the buttons that say “Cookies” on your toaster oven or the “Popcorn” button on your microwave that even ConAgra, maker of microwave popcorn, says you should not use.  My microwave, my toaster oven, they have these stupid, maddening, insulting, ridiculous, harmful buttons.  I hate them, but they’re unavoidable. I didn’t want to read Kim’s story—Electrolux oven has a “perfect turkey button,” put a turkey in, press a button, perfect turkey!—because I knew it would make … my … blood … BOIL! Hey!  Idiot manufacturers!  Cut it out!  The buttons don’t work—even your partners in food crime say so!  Worse, when they don’t work, you are telling your Read On »

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I was honored to be asked to speak at our local TEDxCLE last Friday where I was allowed to try to explain why I think cooking is important.  There’s a great book out now that argues that our ancestors became human only after we began cooking for ourselves and our families. I believe it’s still important, but for different reasons.  Not just sort of important.  Really important.  I’m not saying anything that hasn’t already been said before, but I know it can’t be said enough. Consider that cooking food might be far more vital than you ever imagined.  I don’t believe that everyone ought to cook.  But I think at least one person in every group ought to cook.  We fail to cook for ourselves at our own peril.  I make the case here that Read On »

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As readers here know, I’m a salt advocate, if only because I believe America is hoodwinked into fearing all kinds of natural foods for no good reason. I admit my pleas to have you salt your food as you wish so long as you avoid processed and fast food are based on nothing more than common sense, intuition and personal experience. I don’t do randomized clinical trials. Here, doing something that traditional journalism is so good at, a NYTimes article by John Tierney shows that there is no evidence to say lowering salt in our diet, helps us or hurts us. It might even make us fatter! Again, eat natural foods that you cook yourself and stop listening to the agenda-pushing health police.  See also my recent salt rant.

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