Two reasons to celebrate today: the publication of the first in a series of technique books, How To Roast, and the end of the Hachette-Amazon book pricing war. Presumably Amazon will no longer hide my or other Little Brown authors, or any of the six houses Hachette runs (they’ve just placed an order, my publisher tells me so should have next week, till then if you want to purchase to so through indies or B&N links below. And the way to celebrate is to give away signed copies of the book! I will be giving away FIVE copies to randomly chosen commenters. You must in the comments tell me either your favorite food to roast, or, if it is chicken (my fave), what your favorite side dish is to accompany it. (Can only do Read On »

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Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World’s Most Versatile Ingredient. It honestly did come to me in something like a flash, or a series of small idea explosions, one leading to another to another until the entire landscape went up in flames. The whole of the egg, a miracle of nutrition, economy, utility, and deliciousness, came to me as a single image. All one thing. In this euphoria of eureka, I called out to Donna to help me capture it. Within the hour we had a complete flowchart of the egg on five feet of parchment paper, a document that served as the proposal for this book (and that its publisher, Little, Brown, has not only recreated and tucked into the back of the book, but made interactive in the astonishing electronic version). I will Read On »

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  My friends Stephanie Stiavetti, who writes  The Culinary Life blog, and Garrett McCord, who writes the blog Vanilla Garlic, are publishing their very first book, Melt: The Art of Macaroni and Cheese, on that all-but-infallible pairing of pasta and cheese. When they asked me to write the foreword, I groaned. This is exactly the kind of cookbook we don’t need more of, I thought to myself. But then I read it, and thought this is exactly the kind of cookbook we need, this nation that has so readily accepted orange flavoring packets to stir into their food. Stephanie and Garrett attempt to raise this often thoughtlessly prepared dish to its highest possible level by asking us to take more care with it, to use excellent pasta and excellent cheese. This is not only a book filled with Read On »

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Pizza pan winners from Thursday’s post were chosen by randomizer: Anurag Mehrotra, of Athens, GA Two favorites: one is grilled eggplant and feta topping. The other is a butter chicken sauce with chicken tikka/ tandoori chicken.   Laura Jane Elgass, of Forest Park, IL Probably not original, but for making good use of seasonal ingredients I made a charred corn and cherry tomato pizza with goat cheese, arugula and (ahem, aged) balsamic vinegar the other night. It was pretty tasty! Otherwise, any pizza with prosciutto or good Italian sausage is a winner in my book.  Matt (who preferred not to share his name, which is fine by me as long as he shares his pizza) Spread caramelized onions over the dough and then add some sauteed chard, goat cheese, and sausage.  Thanks to all the rest. Read On »

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Here’s the latest Le Creuset technique video: pizza. So easy and delicious. Make a big batch of dough ahead of time, then portion it and freeze it so you can make pizza whenever the whim strikes! (Note: technique begins at 1:11 of the video.) And even better, Le Creuset is giving away three—count ‘em, THREE!—of these pans! To enter you need to leave a comment with your most original idea for homemade pizza, or tell me your favorite pizza to make at home, or the one, after watching the video, you most want to try. Right this minute I’m hankering for a bacon and egg pizza! (Be sure to leave an email that works so I can contact you; U.S. entries only, alas.) And here’s the link to the potluck entry page. All the technique videos Read On »

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