Deviled egg with smoked salmon and dill on a cucumber wheel. Photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman.

  Reposting on Deviled Egg strategies (and how to make perfect hard-cooked eggs). At an event to promote my new book on the mighty egg, I did a demo of some simple egg dishes with my friend and Cleveland chef, Doug Katz. He had prepared deviled eggs ahead of time, and I was struck by his decision to cut the eggs through their equator rather than lengthwise. He then sliced off some of the white at the bottom so that the eggs rested flat in a large tray. What a brilliant idea! Why hadn’t I thought of this? My only problem with deviled eggs is that I love them so much; but, because they’re so big, I can eat only so many. Doug came up with a solution: Removing a chunk of the white means Read On »

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A post from my friend Carri in Alaska (it’s about more than just fish). Above, “the family that fishes together”—Carri’s husband John and their girls laugh between sets, salmon fishing in Bristol Bay.–M.R.   By Carri Thurman In a recent New York Times article that went viral, Paul Greenberg laid out three simple rules for eating seafood, one of which is to eat American seafood. I was happy to hear that since it is a subject that has become near and dear to me in a very surprising way. When first I stumbled into Homer, Alaska, on a sunny spring day 30 years ago, the fact that this was a “fishing” town had completely escaped me. It wasn’t until I was drinking a beer at the Salty Dawg Saloon on my first night (conveniently located right across the street Read On »

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_COVER Mastering Pasta

I’d like to use Philadelphia chef Marc Vetri‘s new book to rejoice in pasta. It’s called Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto I love pasta! Carbs! Bring them on! How have we brought this upon ourselves? This Anti-Carb Nation. This Gluten-Fearing Country. If I were texting this, I would conclude with my avatar and the new Bitmoji offering: Cray-Cray! (I admit to spending too much time trying to create entire narratives with my Bitmoji avatar.) Seriously, it’s time for us to TAKE BACK OUR PASTA! Vetri’s book (written with the excellent David Joachim) is a fine place to start, with everything you need to know about pasta and making it and shaping it. Indeed, I especially liked the chapter on hand-shaped pastas, probably because I will never spend three hours shaping lorighittas Read On »

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rhubarb pie1

It’s practically balmy here in Cleveland. With most of the snow melted I can’t help but think of spring. Spring means rhubarb. So herewith a re-post from a Michigan baker, as I head down to warmer climes with the family. Lisa Ludwinski is a baker and cook living in Detroit. She recently returned to the Great Lakes State after a six-year stint eating bagels, nannying, and mixing many pounds of cookie dough in Brooklyn, finishing with stints at Momofuku Milk Bar and Four and Twenty Blackbirds. Now she is the owner of Sister Pie, a from-scratch home bakery serving the Detroit area via the Facebook page, and aims to celebrate the seasons with pie and other sweets through unique interpretations and natural ingredients. For now, she’s able to bake pies from home for sale under Michigan’s Read On »

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Senses-X3

  Last week I had lunch with Kate Lee, a senior editor at medium.com, an elegant publishing platform created by the Twitter co-founders (she had a salad, which put me on guard until she agreed to taste some of my terrible-looking but most delicious chicken livers on toast). Medium was in search of writers/content, and my book agent, the lovely Cait Hoyt, said she wanted all her writers to contribute to medium. I’m always interested in new platforms, ideas, ways to share and spread information, and promote my own projects. Medium is about three years old and still trying to find its legs, it seems, though no one denies it’s a great place to read interesting stuff, even if it’s often somehow about itself. Which may scarily be what we’re coming to. One of the subtexts Read On »

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