“Food is important,” I said to the audience at Cleveland Public Library last Thursday night. It was my first line and it got a laugh. I was surprised and encouraged. When I say that to most groups of Americans, they look at me they way cows look up from their grazing. Not even a moo. As I said, it got a laugh, and I was surprised, but I shouldn’t have been because they care about food and they knew why I needed to say it. Because for decades we forgot. We stopped paying attention, because food was everywhere. It still is. But now that it’s making us sick, now that the production of it is fouling our land and our oceans, debasing the animals we eat for food and the workers who handle them, we’ve Read On »

Share

Two weeks ago, sparked by Dianne Jacobs’s question about what defines a successful cookbook, I wrote this post So You Want to Write a Cookbook. But the questions raised intrigued me so much that I reached out to two editors I currently work with and respect, asking them specifically, what books that didn’t sell well or make money do you consider to be successful and why. Maria Guarnaschelli responded at length and reached well beyond the question (if her name sounds familiar to you, it may owe to the fact that her daughter Alex, is the chef at NYC’s Butter and a Food Network regular). Her thoughts and decision-making process are a must-read for anyone writing cookbooks, and certainly for anyone who wants to. The following—as well Lorena Jones’s comments, which follow Maria’s—were conducted via email: What Read On »

Share

Tracie McMillans investigates various US food institutions from the inside to discover their working practices, via Civil Eats.

Share

Broke Ass Gourmet is a blog by Gabi Moskowitz which helps people prepare great meals on the cheap, via BrokeAssgourmet.com  

Share

  Last night, on the Broad Stage with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, I spoke about connections of music and food, in between selections from Puccini, Rossini, de Falla and Schoenfield. When Rachel Fine, executive director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, first wrote to request that I speak, I honestly almost flat turned her down. I’m no music expert, and wasn’t sure what point it would serve. But she pressed, I became intrigued enough to give it some thought and was surprised to discover how many natural similarities there were and are, and perhaps most surprisingly of all to realize a couple of important musical metaphors had worked their way into my own writing without my being conscious of it. The first was my final meal at the French Laundry, having spent several weeks Read On »

Share