Yesterday the NYTimes covered an important health ratio: the amount of potassium relative to the amount salt you consume. While the article by long time health reporter, Jane Brody, leads with the obvious (excessive salt has proven to be a health risk, according to yet another major study), and the headline writer reinforce the obvious (“Sodium-Saturated Diet is a Threat for All”), the article recognizes that everything is about balance and notes the important role potassium-rich foods play in countering salt’s negative effects. “The researchers found that while a diet hight in sodium—salt is the main source—increases your risk,” Brody writes, “even more important is the ratio of sodium (harmful) to potassium (protective) in one’s diet.” This was pointed out to me this summer by Mark Bitterman, author of a great book called Salted, and Read On »

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A study shows that the chemical used to line the inside of soup cans may cause heart problems, via the Independent UK

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Butcher shops are popping up all around the country with staff who know their cuts and where their animals are from, via NYT.

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Last April, I wrote a post about leaving stock out on the stove top claiming that it would be safe to eat provided that you brought it to a simmer before eating. Indeed I’ve been doing this for a decade with no ill effects. On twitter and on the post itself, I received voluminous responses. One response, from a large-animal veterinarian, noted that it was entirely possible for heat-stable toxins, not bacteria, to persist, making the stock unsafe. I revised the post with the vet’s valid warnings with links to the CDC’s warnings on the particular bacteria. But the response was so strong, I suggested in an email to NYTimes food section editor Pete Wells, that this would be a great story.  I’ve left stock out on the stove top for up to three days Read On »

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A large percentage of honey in the USA is from China, learn the risks of this smuggled nectar, via Food Safety News.

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