Today, this is my favorite shoot of these rolls. They were photographed last night before dinner, edited after dinner and delivered via email to Michael before I went to bed. I decided quickly and now I’ve changed my mind. I really want the table in the shot. Another request to pull out the camera now because these babies are going on the table. In situations like this when you don’t really have time to consider what will make the best shot; out of pan, in the pan, cutting board, pulled apart, while buttering—not? The best thing to do is shoot away, try different things, and move as quickly as possible. We decided we liked this shot—OK, but today I’m wondering if I should have cropped it tighter for his blog. After he brushed the butter Read On »

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When Michael asked me to do a salt shot, I thought, “what can I photograph the salt on that’s interesting and makes sense?” Salt—mined—rock—salt of the earth—Hey, I can use my Home Depot slate floor tiles. I bought some that are 12X12 inches and some 5X5 inches.  I’m the kind of girl who likes hardware stores so I have fun looking for interesting inexpensive surfaces and props just about anywhere. And as long as you’re taking a shot like this to illustrate a point, take some others for future use. I love these tiles so much I’m afraid I’ll use them too much. Here they are used for a bread shot taken not so long ago. I stood one tile up in back and blurred the crack line where they met in photoshop.

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After the last shot that ran—Styled Chicken & Dumplings—I am so glad Michael asked for this roasted chicken shot that I just took on Monday. Every Monday Michael serves a roasted chicken, and when this came out of the oven, I decided we should quickly shoot it because; 1: He talks about roasted chicken a lot and we can’t keep running the same photo (even if David Lebovitz loves it). 2: It just looked so beautiful and 3: My lights were all set up. Michael let me get two frames off before he whisked it away. You can see Michael’s hand towel on the handle because he had no intention of letting it go. Flash-flash, and away he went to carve away on his Boos cutting board. I turned off my camera and lights and Read On »

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Because of a few great tips I got from food stylist Adam Pearson at blogger camp, this photo probably looks a lot better. I’m a big fan of showing food in it’s natural state, but rich stews can look like ugly creatures in a dark lagoon. First I paid a lot more attention to the props, thinking about shapes and textures. If this bowl rim was not etched with a hounds tooth pattern, it would look like a giant hot white collar.  Thomas Keller gave us these that he designed with Raynaud Limoges. Thanks TK. And the same with the napkin. Just the addition of texture can help the image be more interesting and less flat. Then, instead of photographing the stew completely mixed, we first put the plain sauce in the bowl, then carefully Read On »

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I love travel photography because you can shoot anything you want, especially when I go off by myself and can really observe and concentrate on the light and what it creates. Here human beings are being silly thinking they can make this beautiful palm tree more beautiful. You have to be willing to get up early to get the light.  I made these sand abstracts early one morning, rising at 6:30 and stopping at 9am because the light gets too harsh. If anyone knows me and had been watching me take these they would surely say, “what IS she doing now?” Had a great time at the food blogger’s camp at Club Med Ixtapa. Food bloggers are wonderful people and food/photography bloggers are super great.  Diane and Tod of whiteonricecouple.com. told us about Animoto videos—thanks Read On »

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