Normally we pick up our CSA share between 9-11 on Sat. mornings—but this morning nobody in this house who has a driver’s license was in any shape to go get it (our friend Blake is visiting)—so our good friend Stu picked it up for us and was rewarded with a great Michael breakfast. The thought of doing another photograph of this stuff along with a hangover motivated the words to come from my mouth, “Stu—don’t move.” Then—Click (with my Lumix point & shoot camera) and here we have our week 18 CSA photo done—and now I’m going back to bed.

Share

After I temporarily moved out of my studio today (our kitchen), Michael realized we needed to photograph the rest of the duck confit process—and he needed it done NOW. Instead of dragging my lights back up to the kitchen I was able to recreate the same lighting situation as the first shot because studio lighting is consistent. You can photograph almost anything with available light and a tripod, but today it is dark with a foggy cloudy sky and,  like I said it needed to be done NOW!  Your lighting doesn’t have to be strobes, but the stronger the light, the faster shutter speed you can use (this shot hand-held @125 sec.) and a greater depth of field (f11). This is one of those photographs you don’t want a shaky spoon and you want everything Read On »

Share

I’m getting really tired of photographing this CSA stuff. The assignment for the CSA blog is to show every vegetable that we get so I feel limited to a bird’s eye view of the lot.  I would prefer to see this photo but it I couldn’t get everything in from this angle. When you go to take a photo of something, after you have the shot you feel is right—spend a little extra time photographing your subject from every angle and side. Sometimes a more interesting image emerges. Happy shooting!

Share

When Michael asked me if I had a photo of Tony for this post my mind visualized him in B&W. Tony is a colorful man but I see his portrait in B&W. Some subjects just demand to be B&W and some demand to be color. An obvious subject for color would be a rainbow. Another obvious subject for B&W other then Tony? This question can only be answered by the photographer. It’s subjective. Here is the original photo this came from: Another reason this just doesn’t work is that this photo was taken in very low light—and it’s hard to get great color in low light. If color doesn’t complement your subject you’re better off just to get rid of it. Happy shooting.

Share

We love to see texture in our photographs—so why do so many food photographs have the food sitting on shiny white plates? Because that’s what restaurants use? Because that’s what we have at home? I’ve been doing the photographs for Michael’s next book and when we started the art director, Vanessa, pretty much told me where to go to buy plates. She did not want to see shiny white or patterned plates and now I understand why. A white or patterned glossy plate is going to draw the viewer’s eye away from the food because it is so bright. Non-glazed ceramic in earth tones work well and use the salad plate size so you don’t end up with a big collar around your subject. Also using things that are not plates at all—like old metal Read On »

Share