Here are six solid summer pasta recipes, including one for cavatelli with lobster, tomato, pea tendrils and lovage, via WSJ.

Share

I have yet to set up my strobes in 2011 because we have had snow, gray skies, and this window in our dinning room that has shutters. I keep this plant stand nearby because it is the perfect height for letting light from the snow outside, which is like a big soft box, to fall on the subject at a low angle. I can use the open shutter as a bounce card, and control the strength of that light by opening or closing the slats. So see—there is something to appreciate about our cold winters. Happy shooting!

Share

It was a beautiful day here in Cleveland when Carri visited and we sat on our porch and enjoyed all that you see here on this board with a nice red wine. When the sun rays lit up her’s jelly, I knew I wanted to recreate that light for a photo. If I’d taken it with the available sunlight right then, not only would it have been a bore, but it would have been very contrasty and would have a shallow depth of field because I would be hand holding my camera. So after we were done, I took the board and brought it inside. Using a spot strobe, very low,  I back lit the jelly and used a soft fill strobe in front.  I  recreated the natural light I’d seen outside. And because the Read On »

Share

The photo on the right was chosen over the photo on the left because it’s more pleasing to look at. Why? That one chip I’ve marked keeps the viewers eye in the photo as opposed to that marked chip on the right that leads the eye out of the frame. It would be hard to go wrong photographing a subject like this. But even great color and texture can be less than successful if the composition isn’t all it can be. Happy shooting!

Share

We’ve had some discussion around here about what size photo files we should be uploading onto the blog. There are varying opinions on acceptable quality—mine being I want high quality because I want my photos to look good. But I do know that the bigger files slow our site down–so what quality am I willing to accept? Let’s take a look at smaller files. This image of Doug is a good one because there is a lot of important information (his face) in a small area, whereas the rest of the photo (grass, rocks & barn) will suffer less with smaller files. I’m not going lower then 123K though some think the image shouldn’t run over 100K. These smaller files make Doug look like he needs a facial real bad—but the rest of the photo Read On »

Share