Taking a breather and have have been eating load upon load of NC clams. So good and so delicious.   The Perfect Way To Cook Clams Use the little guys, little necks or cherrystones. Saute some garlic in a big pot in some butter or oil. Add a cup of white wine and a cup of water (all depends on your pot, you want plenty of steam). Throw in some fresh thyme, dump in your clams, cover and cook on medium high or high. Melt some butter. When the clams open they’re done. If you have a lot, take out the open ones so they don’t over cook. Eat them standing up, dipping clams in butter. If you want, strain the pot liquor through a coffee filter and use to make a clam chowder or Read On »

Share

One of Ohio’s treasures is a farm called Chef’s Garden, run by the Jones family. Long-time commercial farmers, their crops were obliterated by hail in 1980. They had to decide to try to rebuild or find another line of work. They would keep farming but had to start small. They began selling at farmers’ markets in Cleveland and often got special requests from chefs. Within four years they took a gamble and decided to grow only for chefs, with a focus on special edible plants. Good at growing and uncanny promoters of their produce, they soon enticed some of the best known chefs in America. Charlie Trotter was one of their first and biggest promoters, Alain Ducasse another. Amanda Hesser wrote about them in The New York Times in 2000. They continue to sell great Read On »

Share

24-Hour Layover is the new Bourdain spin off show that should launch this fall. So more culinary adventures to come, via Huffington Post.

Share

For years I’ve wanted to devise a new way to present how-to cooking information on a show. There’s a reason why they’ve been dubbed dump-and-stir; because they’re inherently rote. Given that there are only about twenty things you need to know to cook just about anything, it’s inevitable that presenting a few of those techniques is going repetitive after oh, 40 or 50,000 shows.  Yes, people are pushing the format.  Michael Symon does a good job with Cook Like an Iron Chef. Others are trying to put cooking info in the framework of a story, adding layers of media. My old friend from Cooking Under Fire, Ming Tsai, invited me out to be part of his ninth season of “Simply Ming,” a how-to, yes, but always interesting, always informative, with travel, and knowledgeable guest chefs Read On »

Share

In the spring of 1996, a CIA instructor took us on a hunt for morel mushrooms. Why do you love these mushrooms, I asked him. “They’re just too cool,” he said  And they are.  Morels are what mushrooms are all about. They’ve got that gnomish head, brain-like, peculiar, twisted. They’re wild, what forager Connie Green calls a gift-of-God mushroom, unpredictable. And kind of scary looking, dangerous (hopeful phallus, menacingly wrinkled cap).  And they taste so deeply mushroomy, of the earth they rise out of.  We spent all day in the Hudson Valley, and I didn’t find one. My friend Adam did, found two, gave them to me with a scowl, angry he didn’t find more. I cut them open; tiny bugs scurried everywhere inside. When my friend JD Sullivan said “Want to go look for Read On »

Share