24-Hour Layover is the new Bourdain spin off show that should launch this fall. So more culinary adventures to come, via Huffington Post.

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For years I’ve wanted to devise a new way to present how-to cooking information on a show. There’s a reason why they’ve been dubbed dump-and-stir; because they’re inherently rote. Given that there are only about twenty things you need to know to cook just about anything, it’s inevitable that presenting a few of those techniques is going repetitive after oh, 40 or 50,000 shows.  Yes, people are pushing the format.  Michael Symon does a good job with Cook Like an Iron Chef. Others are trying to put cooking info in the framework of a story, adding layers of media. My old friend from Cooking Under Fire, Ming Tsai, invited me out to be part of his ninth season of “Simply Ming,” a how-to, yes, but always interesting, always informative, with travel, and knowledgeable guest chefs Read On »

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In the spring of 1996, a CIA instructor took us on a hunt for morel mushrooms. Why do you love these mushrooms, I asked him. “They’re just too cool,” he said  And they are.  Morels are what mushrooms are all about. They’ve got that gnomish head, brain-like, peculiar, twisted. They’re wild, what forager Connie Green calls a gift-of-God mushroom, unpredictable. And kind of scary looking, dangerous (hopeful phallus, menacingly wrinkled cap).  And they taste so deeply mushroomy, of the earth they rise out of.  We spent all day in the Hudson Valley, and I didn’t find one. My friend Adam did, found two, gave them to me with a scowl, angry he didn’t find more. I cut them open; tiny bugs scurried everywhere inside. When my friend JD Sullivan said “Want to go look for Read On »

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Watch the Chef Daniel Klein of the Perennial Plate catch, butcher, and prepare bullfrogs in Arkansas, via the Perennial Plate.

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Modern foragers are impacting restaurants menus across the world.  Foraging is gaining popularity both in rural and urban settings, via WSJ.

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