I’d been looking for a long ago recipe card used by my parents titled “Britta’s Glogg” to do a post about it (and because I hadn’t made it in years). Then all of a sudden I start seeing recipes for mulled wine all over the place. I don’t remember seeing any in years and then, two different ones from just in the NYTimes alone, one in the Sunday Magazine, another by writer Melissa Clark. It was not the drinking of the glogg that stays in the memory—it wasn’t till later that I would actually have been drinking it—it was the aroma of it. I’ve recently become aware of how powerful the smells of food cooking in house are. They are a natural stress reliever. When I made a batch of glogg this year, the first Read On »

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A canadian specialty of fries, gravy, and cheese curds.  This blog rates poutine from all over, via Poutine Chronicles.

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I made my staple Lemon-Cumin Dal the other day and while I served, Donna brought the pappadams over to the light for this photo. I always serve these Indian—what, crackers?—with dal. They add a delicate crisp crunch to the meal and an exotic (to me) flavor. If you’ve never served them, I urge you to try them. Not only delicious, but fun to cook! Made from lentil or chickpea flour, they’re sold as flat smooth discs. Slip them into hot oil and they puff and fold and are finished in five seconds. While I’m hoping a prominent food blogger, who publishes one of the most lovely recipe blogs I know, will try the recipe for this mung-bean-based dal, featured in Twenty, it reminds me of two other writer cooks specializing in Indian food. The wonderful Read On »

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Learn how the Alaskan Inupiat Eskimos hunt whales in this day and age, by using modern technology, via NYT.

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  Most weekday mornings I eat a bowl of homemade granola with a big dollop of homemade yogurt on top.  It’s hard to get over the amount of money you pay for granola at the store. Also, I find most granola too loaded with sugar; I don’t like it as sweet as it invariably is (here’s my strawberry-banana granola recipe). Yogurt is the same, both the quality and the cost make the home-prepared better and less expensive than what you can buy at the grocery store. Also, I want to make sure it’s got plenty of vigorous, gut-healthy bacteria. I make a batch of yogurt about once every three weeks or so, using a spoonful of the previous batch to inoculate the fresh whole milk. I usually make regular yogurt because I like the whey Read On »

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