I’m so pleased with results of the cooked eggnog I wrote for the last post, I wanted to give an official tested recipe.  Don’t misunderstand me.  I’m a fan of raw egg eggnog, as well as aged-for-two-years raw eggnog. I don’t believe anyone should be afraid of eating raw egg (especially if you buy organic or well-raised eggs).  Raw yolk on raw ground beef is a delight, a kind of ready made sauce. I love a homemade mayo, a runny poached egg.  Indeed, raw or warm egg is one of the great pleasures of cooking and eating.  So here’s to lots of eggs in 2010—may more of them be laid by healthy happy chickens! But there are those who may be concerned or have reason not to take any chances.  There are also those who Read On »

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The guy I buy arugula from at our market has a neighbor who raises quail and he brings a few dozen of the eggs each week to sell for his neighbor. I got a batch of each not too long ago (he grows lettuce under plastic well into December).  I’ve scarcely touched quail eggs.  A couple times in culinary school (garde manger, quail egg and caviar pizza). But they were not something I thought much about.  That’s changed. If they’re available to you (I’m told you can often find them at Asian markets) they’re a lot of fun, special because of their size, and easy to work with. They make an impressive canapé.  This is a take on eggs Benedict: arugula sautéed with shallot, bacon, English muffin croutons, topped with a little fried quail egg Read On »

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