It turns the stomach, the kind of email Marlene sent me over the weekend. Marlene who runs the cooking site CooksKorner said that one of Ruhlman’s Twenty recipe testers, Matthew Kayahara, had done a 4x recipe of the cookies in the book (page 161), the basic cinnamon-sugar cookie, and it was badly out of whack. Indeed, when Marlene checked what was in the book, she found that the published recipe contained three times the amount of granulated sugar it should have. It’s a book writer’s nightmare. It also reminds me what a great thing an ebook is or an app that updates on your device automatically. But there is some small recourse. I can announce the error here and publish a correction. Here it is, the tested and true snickerdoodle recipe, based on one sent Read On »

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Davis Lebovitz writes about making chocolate ice cream from Jeni’s Splendid ice Cream at Home cookbook, via David Lebovitz.

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Can’t decide between a traditional rich creamy recipe or a tangy one. Try a little bit of both with a creme fraiche cheesecake, via NYT.

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Been so busy recently have scarcely had time to post.  Just got back from taking James to camp 🙁  My chief videographer and dessert innovator. I was in Boston talking salt on Simply Ming.  I was in NYC working on confections with Bouchon Bakery head chef Sebastien Rouxel and putting together a pitch for a chef drama with some friends.  I came home to find a great new ice cream book from Ohio’s own Jeni Britton Bauer!  Salt, sweets, ice cream, and an unused photo donna shot for the new book due out in fall: salted-caramel! Of course.  Caramel is one of those awesome no brainer dessert sauces that more people ought to do at home.  Takes 10 minutes tops, uses inexpensive ingredients, and is easy ( just be sure to use a really big Read On »

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I’ve spent nearly a week in the Napa Valley working on the Bouchon Bakery Cookbook.  This will be the fifth book in a series led by Thomas Keller that began with The French Laundry Cookbook which is one of the best chef-restaurant cookbooks ever (do we need full dislosure here?). Forget the words I write—these books are truly fine and costly productions, and I think it’s important for people to know what goes into books of this magnitude, because so often people don’t know.  A team of people, from the many at Artisan, an imprint of Workman Publishing, who make beautiful books, to the commis at the restaurants who scale out the mise en place for the recipes for the chefs, and all those in between, including myself. In 1997, I flew out here to Read On »

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