Tomorrow, I review Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking for The New York Times, the heavily hyped and praised 6 volume, 2400-page romp through the whole world of cooking, a manifesto pronouncing the arrival of a new cultural movement.  I’ll be happy to answer questions here tomorrow about the book or the review and I’ll look in on the Times food blog as well where I describe my first attempt at cooking from the book (photo below). I confess this was an incredibly daunting assignment.  It’s an honor to be able to hold forth on what some are calling, accurately, the most important cookbook in years (seven, by my count, since McGee’s revised On Food and Cooking was published), in The Times, no less. A huge responsibility. I’d need as many degrees as Read On »

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Check out a quick video on the classic duck press.  This dish looks like it will be presented at Next, via Next Restaurant.

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Polcyn discusses charcuterie and the food scene in Detroit.  He also talks about the economics of the pig, via Crain’s Detroit.

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Just returned to snowy Clevelandtown, a twenty-two hour haul from Lyon via Heathrow and O’Hare, thinking all the while on the Bocuse d’Or competition and feeling bad for Team USA, and wondering what to make of it all. “This was a tough one to swallow,” Chef Kaysen wrote in an email, hours after the competition.  “I think I need some months to really draw all the inspiration that was seen there.  I realized in the beginning of the day after seeing both Denmark and Sweden that we did not play the game—we went there and did our food, we did what we thought was right because we loved it so much, but clearly there is a defined game in the way that food that should be presented.  Once that is figured out, then we have Read On »

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What do culinary competitions mean in America? Reality shows on Bravo and the Food Network pitting chefs against one another have made compelling TV and earned huge audiences here, but actual not-made-for-TV competitions remain off the radar. American chefs who competed in them were relative unknowns, and the most well-known chefs, those with high profile restaurants, tended to dismiss them for their old fashioned, aspic-coated food platters and the hotel and country club chefs who created them. But in 2008, one of the most revered chefs in the world, Paul Bocuse, famed both for his food and his restaurant as well as his unusual media savvy, aimed to change that by attempting to elevate the competition he created in 1987 in the eyes of America. To do this, he asked two of America’s most famous Read On »

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