I’m such a homebody, I dread book tour trips and typically stress about them, and I nearly always return thrilled to have gone and surprised and amazed by what I encountered. Last week was Chicago and the schedule was so tight that I took a taxi from O’Hare straight to the Chicago Tribune’s test kitchen where Monica Eng, formerly a food reporter now on the investigative beat, reverted to her former purview to join me in making an easy Coq au Vin from Ruhlman’s Twenty (I forgot how good it was till I tasted it—haven’t made it since Donna took the pix). I had time for a quick lunch after across the street at The Purple Pig (pig ears and the artichokes), excellent casual place recommended by a twitter friend. That night there was a Read On »

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Chef Phillip Foss & Andrew Brochu share their ideas on cuisine, check out his new menu items too, via The Pickled Tongue.

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Video: watch the Kocurek Family discuss the history of charcuterie and their business, via Huffington Post.

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David Padberg of Park Kitchen in Portland, Oregon shares his thoughts on food, culture and more in his personal blog, via Nourishing Ideas.

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One of Ohio’s treasures is a farm called Chef’s Garden, run by the Jones family. Long-time commercial farmers, their crops were obliterated by hail in 1980. They had to decide to try to rebuild or find another line of work. They would keep farming but had to start small. They began selling at farmers’ markets in Cleveland and often got special requests from chefs. Within four years they took a gamble and decided to grow only for chefs, with a focus on special edible plants. Good at growing and uncanny promoters of their produce, they soon enticed some of the best known chefs in America. Charlie Trotter was one of their first and biggest promoters, Alain Ducasse another. Amanda Hesser wrote about them in The New York Times in 2000. They continue to sell great Read On »

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