I’m presumably in Stonington, Maine, cutting pig and rejoicing in the glories of the hog with Charcuterie pal and co-author Brian Polcyn, to benefit the Island Culinary & Ecological Center. (Join us if you’re anywhere near Stonington! Details here.) From Maine we return to wonderful Traverse City and Pigstock, so I’m reposting this splendid cocktail made from gin and preserved Michigan cherries (don’t have any on hand? improvise!—a gin sour with preserved fruit). —MR A PR firm sent me a bottle of Nolet’s gin, which I was happy to taste (and used in The Southside), but when I was researching the gin I came across a Cocktail Enthusiast review of the gin, and lo! What’s this? The author of the post, Kevin Gray, included a cocktail recipe pairing the gin with sour cherries. His post Read On »

Share

The Madison based company has a Kickstarter campaign to share their Hazards Analysis and Critical Control POints (HACCP) plans with everyone, via Food Tech Connect.      

Share

Learn more about the wonders of this delicious preserved fish, via Independent UK.

Share

Is this being mean? Happy Tuesday. If you liked this post, read: DIY: Home-Cured Bacon Candied Bacon Ice Cream recipe from David Lebovitz. Bourbon Bacon Jam from Evil Shenanigans. Sounds odd, but it’s good. The revised and updated Charcuterie has just been published. © 2013 Michael Ruhlman. Photo © 2013 Donna Turner Ruhlman. All rights reserved.  

Share

We’re back again with another valuable technique, the water bath, essential for gentle cooking. The water bath uses the miracle tool, water. Water makes life as we know it possible. It’s one of the only substances that expands when it freezes rather than contracts (if it didn’t, ice would sink, not simply ruining your gin and tonic, but rendering the gin and tonic moot, as most of habitable earth would be flooded). Water cannot go above 212°F in normal circumstances (it can if you heat it under pressure or, with less pressure, specifically at high altitudes, it turns to gas at lower temperatures). And importantly, it cools as it evaporates (which is why sweating cools our body). In this video we use it to gently cook emulsified shrimp and cream, mixed with whole chunks of Read On »

Share