The dastardly minds at OpenSky have created an extraordinary collection of kitchen tools to lure you into their clutches. You are hereby forewarned! But the fact is, they really are offering all of these great tools to one lucky winner who will get all of the above.  All you have to do is follow me on OpenSky and you’re entered.  (For those who already follow me there, you are already automatically entered!) Click here for a chance to win these kitchen essentials at OpenSky. For those of you not familiar with OpenSky, it’s a relatively new ecommerce site sourcing cool stuff recommended by food, health, style and design experts. They allow me to recommend kitchen tools I personally love. I only offer tools and food products I would buy and use myself, and only if Read On »

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Ok, this is it, my last new book: Ruhlman’s Twenty: 20 Techniques, 100 Recipes, a Cook’s Manifesto.” A distillation of all I’ve learned. I’m hoping it’s every bit as fascinating and pompous as my previous book, Ratio. But it’s very different, a big lavish book with great color photography to illustrate the techniques and recipes. Twenty is the exploration of a single idea: that all of cooking can be reduced to a handful of techniques. It’s not as if you have to master a thousand techniques in order to cook well. Or even a hundred. You only need to know about about 20 things (you surely know more already than you think you do). My goal is to explore the basic techniques we need to know to cook everything else. This is all I’ve been Read On »

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Donna and I spent half the day yesterday shooting the promotional video for our new book, out next month, and I figured I should ask our videographer, Cynthia Albanese, to shoot as much video as possible.  So in addition to describing the book, I also roasted a chicken, made stock and made a soup from the stock to demonstrate The Generosity of a Chicken.  We had fresh corn, tomatoes from the garden and everyone loves the dynamic flavor the lime juice gives this soup, the richness of the avocado, and fresh crunchy tortillas, so that’s what I made. When you’ve got delicious stock on hand, you’re five minutes away from dozens of possible meals.  I could have used left over chicken and some noodles, I could have cooked potatoes in it, pureed it, finished it Read On »

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Many have asked when our book, Salumi, a follow up or really continuation of our Charcuterie, will be out.  I finished the rewrite earlier this summer, and Brian, chef-owner of Forest Grill, my co-author whom I first wrote about in Soul of a Chef, finished up recipe testing, so the book is now slated for a summer 2012 publication. The book is devoted solely to the Italian craft of dry-curing meat.  Salumi is the general term for these meats.  Above were some trials I dried in the wine cellar of my dear friend, JD SULLIVAN!!!  It proved to be ideal, and a nice patina of beneficial mold grew naturally on the salame above. In the foreground is guanciale, dry-cured jowl.  I’m slicing some coppa; also on the board, tied, is lonza (dry-cured loin) and a small Read On »

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I’ve spent nearly a week in the Napa Valley working on the Bouchon Bakery Cookbook.  This will be the fifth book in a series led by Thomas Keller that began with The French Laundry Cookbook which is one of the best chef-restaurant cookbooks ever (do we need full dislosure here?). Forget the words I write—these books are truly fine and costly productions, and I think it’s important for people to know what goes into books of this magnitude, because so often people don’t know.  A team of people, from the many at Artisan, an imprint of Workman Publishing, who make beautiful books, to the commis at the restaurants who scale out the mise en place for the recipes for the chefs, and all those in between, including myself. In 1997, I flew out here to Read On »

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