carrot

  It’s been a busy year. I published two books, How To Roast this past fall, the first in a series of technique books, and a big book on the Egg this past spring. I continue to love the dialogue that some of the opinion pieces here inspire; I’m gratified by the enthusiasm with which the Friday Cocktail Hour was greeted (and lamented … perhaps it will return). And people enjoy the recipes when they appear, whether from me or a guest poster. The following are the top-rated posts from 2014, and all of these categories are represented. The Opinion Posts, on our health and the importance of cooking, both reported and rant-only: Don’t Eat Healthy Carb Confusion: An internist at the Cleveland Clinic, who has a deep interest in nutrition, talked to me last summer about Read On »

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cook-books-@1020

I get sent a lot of cookbooks throughout the year, some from publishers looking for blurbs, others just wanting me to know a book has been published. Recently I reviewed some select books out this season for the Wall Street Journal (it will be online for everyone here after a couple weeks). One of those books, which I highly recommend for baking, is Dorie Greenspan’s Baking Chez Moi. But it is not featured above because I am giving it to someone who can actually bake. What is the story about the five books above? As I said, I get a lot of books throughout the year, more than I actually have room for in the downstairs of our house. Cookbook space is now severely rationed. After much difficult thought, the above books are the ones I didn’t Read On »

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MR-xmas-books-@1020

It’s been a busy publishing year, both frustrating (for many, many months Amazon made it hard for people to buy my books, mine and thousands of others, due to a dispute with Hachette) and exciting. I don’t think I’ve ever published two books in the same year. The big book is Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World’s Most Versatile Ingredient. (Chris Kimball of America’s Test Kitchen last week picked it as one of his favorites. Thanks Chris, and sorry no macarons! The egg is inexhaustible; I couldn’t put every form of meringue in there!) My publisher, Little, Brown, also created an absolutely killer interactive iBook based on the ingenious egg flow chart I created. Yes, ingenious. Ferran Adrià even said so! The second book is Ruhlman’s How to Roast: Foolproof Techniques and Recipes for the Home Cook, Read On »

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Roast-Turkey-done10

It’s the annual nationwide freak-out. That damned turkey! So many questions, so much uncertainty! I hope this goes a little ways toward easing your mind if you are among the turkey afflicted. Of course, a detailed recipe and process shots are in my latest book, Ruhlman’s How to Roast. For the last couple of years I’ve recommended a roast-braise hybrid. This year a straightforward roast, from the book. Publishers Weekly published a full-on version (see below). Here I just want to go through the basics. You must have good turkey stock on hand, which is easy to do, but you can also buy low-sodium organic broth as well. Stuff the cavity full of onions and lemon and carrots and celery to keep hot air from circulating in the bird’s cavity and overcooking the breast. Truss Read On »

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Roast-cover

Many thanks to all who took the time to comment. So much fun to read. My able assistant used randomizer to choose the winners. Here they are! Email me your shipping addresses if you read this but I’ll also be in touch via email. Elliott Papineau Carrots! Finished with reduced carrot and orange juice. Tonya I love a mix of roasted sweet potatoes, carrots, yellow onion and brussels sprouts with garlic and olive oil or a salsa/enchilada sauce made by roasted tomatillos, onion, garlic and chili pepper until charred then blending. Depending on what I am doing with the sauce maybe adding in some crema/yogurt to add smooth tang. Rita Connelly i love roasting. Chicken is my favorite. And you. Michael, are one of my favorite food writers. I write about food as well; reviews Read On »

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