Senses-X3

Last week I had lunch with Kate Lee, a senior editor at medium.com, an elegant publishing platform created by the Twitter co-founders (she had a salad, which put me on guard until she agreed to taste some of my terrible-looking but most delicious chicken livers on toast). Medium was in search of writers/content and my book agent, the lovely Cait Hoyt, said she wanted all her writers to contribute to medium. I’m always interested in new platforms, ideas, ways to share and spread information, and promote my own projects.  Medium is about three years old and still trying to find it’s legs, it seems, though no one denies it’s a great place to read interesting stuff, even if it’s often somehow about itself. Which may scarily be what we’re coming to. One of the subtexts of Read On »

Share
Carri's-Yule-Log

  Carri Thurman has been a friend since she traveled from her home in Homer, Alaska, to visit her fellow Homerian, Daniel Coyle, an author and journalist who’d moved to Cleveland with his Cleveland-born wife—bless you, Dan! (His last book, The Talent Code, is a fascinating look at how talent is developed.) Carri runs Two Sisters Bakery in Homer, and she offers here some fabulous confections for the holidays, right up our alley—proving once again that chocolate, like life, is better with bacon. Thanks for sharing, Carri, and for all the helpful step-by-step pix! —MR   by Carri Thurman “Winter is not a season, it is an occupation.”—Sinclair Lewis Does it get dark there? It’s a question we get a lot this far north. And Yes, Dorothy, it does get dark. Quite dark. Here in the South Central region Read On »

Share
carrot

I’m on the road today, flying home at long last after my West Coast EGG book tour, so I’ve asked my friend Michelle of Nom Nom Paleo for a guest post and recipe from her dynamic new book while I recover. Thanks, Michelle!—M.R.   Carrot and Cardamom Soup Nothing signals springtime like a bowl of sunshine-orange soup. And surprise: it’s paleo-friendly to boot! After all, paleo’s not about deprivation, eating tons of meat, or simply recreating grain-free versions of your favorite comfort foods. Many dishes that rely on seasonal bounty are naturally paleo-friendly, just like this one from our new cookbook, Nom Nom Paleo: Food For Humans. 1 tablespoon coconut oil 2 large leeks, white and light green ends only, cleaned, trimmed, and thinly sliced Kosher salt 1½ pounds large carrots, peeled and cut into Read On »

Share
2-egg-for-blog

Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World’s Most Versatile Ingredient. It honestly did come to me in something like a flash, or a series of small idea explosions, one leading to another to another until the entire landscape went up in flames. The whole of the egg, a miracle of nutrition, economy, utility, and deliciousness, came to me as a single image. All one thing. In this euphoria of eureka, I called out to Donna to help me capture it. Within the hour we had a complete flowchart of the egg on five feet of parchment paper, a document that served as the proposal for this book (and that its publisher, Little, Brown, has not only recreated and tucked into the back of the book, but made interactive in the astonishing electronic version). I will Read On »

Share
Paleo diet. Photo by

I gave an enthusiastic blurb to Michelle Tam’s book Nom Nom Paleo because I was so captivated by its exuberant spirit. Having met her at the IACP conference in Chicago on Monday, I’m delighted to find she has every bit the same spirit conveyed by her excellent book and lovely blog. While I’m anti-diet anything, I’m intrigued by the sense Paleo diets seems to make, at least intuitively, given the health issues created by Americans’ reliance on sugar-laden processed food. I’ve always promoted a sensible approach to eating that includes all foods, and I’ll never give up pasta or good bread, but I do think that I could adapt some influences of the Paleo diet, which eschews heavily processed foods, refined grains, and sugar, in order to keep my tubbo within acceptable range. So I Read On »

Share