Scientists may soon be able to grow artificial meat in labs by merging pig stem cells and horse foetus serum.  Frankenburger Lives, via the Telegraph UK.

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I love benevolent crazy people, people who just do things because they have to. Sometimes they make sense (Dickson Despommier and vertical farming). Sometimes they make no sense at all (making a farm and raising livestock in urban Oakland, which is what Novella Carpenter did—totally crazy, and she wrote a fabulous book about it called Farm City). I know benevolent insanity the moment I hear it and I heard it the moment I heard Prescott Frost’s voice: “Every acre I can change from corn to grass, the better.  It’s the only way we’re going to change this train wreck that we have now,” he told me by phone last week.  He was calm and direct. “My mission is to change agriculture, to rip up the corn and put it to pasture.” Easier said than done, of Read On »

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Heart is an excellent muscle to eat: it’s lean and flavorful (meaty but not organy—it’s a hard working muscle, not squishy spleen), it’s got a good bite, and it’s inexpensive (I bought the three-pound grass-fed beef heart for six bucks last Saturday). And one more thing: it puts to use a cut that is often thrown away; it’s important that we do our best to make use of all parts of the animals we kill for our food. I use a beef heart here, but you can use a veal heart which is a little more tender and mild.  I first had beef heart a couple summers ago when Pardus visited. He stuck it on skewers, a good strategy because you invariably end up with different sized chunks after trimming.  Last year, during Pardus’s visit, Read On »

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The EU has just recognized that the Cornish pastie must originate from Cornwall, England therefore giving it DPO status, via Independent UK.

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Blogger Olga Massov shares her recipe for a true Russian summer classic; cold borscht, via Sassy Radish.

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