When your computer crashes, you find out just how precarious your life is without technology. None of yesterday’s work was backed up, so that’s what’s going on here! Today will be spent trying to restore what I can. Life will be normal again, I suppose, soon but not now. Thank goodness for good partners (viz Donna), wonderful assistants (thank you, Emilia!), and easy staple meals that you can count on, meals that are a breeze to prepare and a comfort to eat at the end of a frustrating day.   The following is a weekly staple dinner in the Ruhlman household, a simple beef stir-fry, published in Ruhlman’s Twenty, which happily just won both a James Beard award and an IACP award.   Wishing all a productive day and good food throughout (and don’t forget to back Read On »

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A while ago I wrote about Aaron Miller (above, photo by Donna Turner Ruhlman) and his grassfed beef, which I’ve found to be astonishingly succulent for 100% grassfed (it’s all in how you treat the grass, he says; you are what you eat, even if you’re a cow). We cooked his turkey at Thanksgiving.  He also raises excellent pigs. And now he’s started a lamb program,  available by order from their site.  I cooked some for Jonathon Sawyer, chef at The Greenhouse Tavern, and he took one smell and said, “You can smell it’s grass-fed!” Aaron and his wife Melissa are part of growing number of small farmers raising animals on grass. I’d love for more bloggers to post links to livestock farmers in their area raising animals for food, sustainably and well. If you Read On »

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It’s not too late to corn your own beef if you celebrate St. Paddy’s day! I haven’t yet and my wife, who has Irish roots, expects it on this day! Below is a recipe for a quick cure, which should work on most contemporary briskets which are an inch or two thick (it’s all in the pickling spice, which you can buy or better, use our recipe below, far far superior than store bought if you’re not pressed for time). You can also use a two-inch thick chuck roast or any two-inch thick cut of meat (I actually prefer chuck roast because the briskets are so lean these days, and more expensive). See recipe for the beef below and method for finishing the meal in the post; if you use pink salt (sodium nitrite) in Read On »

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My neighbor, Lois Baron, gave me a version of this recipe, which calls for roasting and braising a beef brisket. When I told her I intended to give it a shot using leftover pot roast she said, excellent idea! Kreplach, a great way to make use of leftovers. Kreplack are often called Jewish ravioli, a staple of Jewish cuisine. Consistent with that cuisine, the main item is cooked, then it’s cooked again, and then its cooked again. (Why is this?!) At least in Lois’s recipe. A brisket is roasted, then it’s braised, then it’s ground with seasonings and egg, wrapped in dough, boiled, cooled then cooked to serve. That’s three times that it gets fully cooked before being eaten. These are traditionally used in soup, and they’re great that way, but Lois fried some for me and Read On »

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A hearty winter recipe for steak and kidney pie, via Guardian UK.

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