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  Today, I’d like to introduce our new subscription app called Charcuterie, a messaging app that aims not only to facilitate conversation and serve as a forum to answer questions people have about curing and preserving food, but one that will offer education, reliable reporting, and vivid storytelling. All of it led by myself and my partner in Charcuterie, chef Brian Polcyn, including many other chefs and experts as well. We want our content to inspire conversation and also to encourage people to cook and to cure. We’re using a messaging app because, in its simplicity, it enables anyone to participate and do so easily, either publicly or in private conversations. Interaction promotes learning, and conversation builds relationships. We wouldn’t be able to do this if we didn’t think it could be self-sustaining and profitable, but we’re Read On »

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  (First published in Finesse, Thomas Keller’s superb magazine, earlier this year.) In the 1970s, the egg was bad-for-you food in America. After being a mainstay of the human diet for millennia, doctors here decreed that the cholesterol-laden yolk clogged arteries and resulted in heart attacks. Eat an egg if you must, nutritionists warned, but only in limited quantities. And after 30 years of telling us to avoid eggs and order up those egg white omelettes, the American Heart Association changed its mind—oops!—and declared that eggs, like an unjustly punished child, could once again return to the dining table. As I began to write about the egg, I realized the egg fatwa was no isolated event. Indeed, it came to symbolize for me what was wrong with the way we think about food and how we let others decide what we eat. Read On »

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  Just back from a fabulous trip to Hawaii on a magazine assignment. Such a great time, wanted to share some iPhone shots. Top: Opah, at the Honolulu fish auction. Terribly shabby view from my hotel in Maui, the Andaz resort. Breakfast at Lee Anne Wong’s Koko Head Cafe (garlic rice, beef patty, mushroom gravy, egg). Below: Adam Watten of the soon-to-be-opened Hanai, a market and eating venue, standing at his makeshift smoker. Lee Anne Wong with chef Mark Noguchi. A farmers’ market on Kauai. Watten’s menu for the night he cooked for a group of us. Chickens on the beach in Kauai, where the birds run wild all over the island. The Papahana Kuaola, a restoration site on Oahu. Soursop fruit at farmers’ market. The biggest Spam display I’ve ever seen. Smoke-roasted baby pig from Steelgrass Farm, Kauai.   My final mai tai, alas. The Read On »

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  Yesterday the Washington Post published my article “No Food is Healthy, Not Even Kale.”   JOIN MICHAEL ONLINE TODAY! Don’t forget to join me online for this Wednesday’s Free Range chat at noon EST at live.washingtonpost.com.     If you liked this post, then you will enjoy these links: My past posts on Roasted Chicken Provençal, New Cooking App: Feast, and Happy New Year. Other recent rants: Cook Your Own Food: Eat What You Want, Is the Government Right This Time?, Food Fascism. The ever-popular post on America: Too Stupid to Cook . Books you should check out: The Third Plate, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and Real Food: What to Eat and Why. © 2016 Michael Ruhlman. Photo © 2016 Donna Turner Ruhlman. All rights reserved.

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  On Sunday I went to a party, El Dio de Les Puercos! at Dickson’s Farmstand Meats in the Chelsea market, hosted by Jake Dickson. The room was packed with butchers from all over New York. Evan Brady (above, left), who gave me some of the best speck I’ve had, came from Wappinger Falls (he runs an online butcher’s supply store, Butcher’s Pantry). Jeremy Stanton, who runs The Meat Market in Great Barrington, sliced some fabulous Ossabaw prosciutto. I met a sprite of a girl named Flannery (after the writer) who is a cutter at The Meat Hook in Brooklyn. One of the founders of the Meat Hook (a store I love!), Brent Young, told me he was a grad student years ago studying education when, unhappy, he wrote me an email. I told him to get off his ass Read On »

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