Wheat-X2-for-blog

  Yesterday the Washington Post published my article “No Food is Healthy, Not Even Kale.”   JOIN MICHAEL ONLINE TODAY! Don’t forget to join me online for this Wednesday’s Free Range chat at noon EST at live.washingtonpost.com.     If you liked this post, then you will enjoy these links: My past posts on Roasted Chicken Provençal, New Cooking App: Feast, and Happy New Year. Other recent rants: Cook Your Own Food: Eat What You Want, Is the Government Right This Time?, Food Fascism. The ever-popular post on America: Too Stupid to Cook . Books you should check out: The Third Plate, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and Real Food: What to Eat and Why. © 2016 Michael Ruhlman. Photo © 2016 Donna Turner Ruhlman. All rights reserved.

Share
nyc23

  On Sunday I went to a party, El Dio de Les Puercos! at Dickson’s Farmstand Meats in the Chelsea market, hosted by Jake Dickson. The room was packed with butchers from all over New York. Evan Brady (above, left), who gave me some of the best speck I’ve had, came from Wappinger Falls (he runs an online butcher’s supply store, Butcher’s Pantry). Jeremy Stanton, who runs The Meat Market in Great Barrington, sliced some fabulous Ossabaw prosciutto. I met a sprite of a girl named Flannery (after the writer) who is a cutter at The Meat Hook in Brooklyn. One of the founders of the Meat Hook (a store I love!), Brent Young, told me he was a grad student years ago studying education when, unhappy, he wrote me an email. I told him to get off his ass Read On »

Share
Stock-Mise-en-place

  Want to make Thanksgiving day easier on yourself and ensure you have the best gravy ever? Start now. (Or this weekend.) This, too, planning ahead, is part of mise en place, one of the most important cooking “techniques” to recognize. Mise en place literally translates as put in place. To a cook, mise en place refers to his or her station set-up—having all that you need, at your station and in place, to accomplish the work ahead. Mise en place is shorthand for being prepared, at your station and in your mind. (I write about this more completely in Ruhlman’s Twenty.) It’s the cook’s first order of business, at a restaurant, at home. Making a roast chicken dinner with green beens and baked potato? Get everything out on the counter before you pick that Read On »

Share
FullSizeRender

I’m spending time in my studio apartment in NYC now and so have been cooking for one and thinking about the unusual nature of the task: single portions using as few pans as possible. I’ve posted recently on the importance of duck confit, and how it represents for me our ingenuity in terms of preserving food. But sometimes duck confit is just duck confit: a satisfying and delicious meal. And perfect for one in a tiny kitchen. Especially given that prepared duck confit is right around the corner at the most excellent Dickson’s Farmstand Meats in the Chelsea Market (I wrote about them last year). Happily, the wonderful company D’Artagnan makes duck confit and sells to many grocers and they also can ship directly to you. D’Artagnan is celebrating its 30th anniversary on Monday—congrats, Ariane! For this Read On »

Share
6a00d83451b42169e201157097bcf5970b-800wi

I’m meeting with my editor from Little, Brown at the end of the week to run through ideas for the next cookbook (which I claimed I wouldn’t write … so sue me; perhaps it’s an illness). But I honestly don’t know what to explore. So I’m coming here for ideas. Of course, I always have teaching in mind when I write a cookbook, teaching myself, first and foremost. But I’d like to put the question out to home cooks and chefs alike. What book is most necessary, what cookbook doesn’t yet exist? Sous vide is ever on my mind, but I don’t know if that’s the right thing to do. Also, there are now several good books out there on the subject from people who have more experience than I. Modernist Cuisine Made Easy, sous vide Read On »

Share