I almost never “do” recipes. I’ve written a book that if anything is an anti-recipe book. I set out on this culinary journey in part because, as I wrote in Making of a Chef, I sensed that recipes were nothing more than a tease, that the real cooking lay beneath the recipes. This is not to say that recipes are bad. Say you made a really killer stir-fry and wanted to be able to do it over and over, or you wanted your best friend to give it a try, you’d want to follow a recipe. If you want to recreate a dish, you need a recipe. I could probably make a decent oatmeal raisin cookie just by figuring it out, but I’d feel better at least glancing at a few recipes. The whole of Read On »

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Pickled vegetables are a great side dish you can make in the winter, via NYT.

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A photo list of 10 foods that many either enjoy or detest, Via Huffington Post.

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Blogger Ree Drummond shares a great winter warming recipe for Tuscan bean soup, via The Pioneer Woman.

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  Yesterday the NYTimes covered an important health ratio: the amount of potassium relative to the amount salt you consume. While the article by long time health reporter, Jane Brody, leads with the obvious (excessive salt has proven to be a health risk, according to yet another major study), and the headline writer reinforce the obvious (“Sodium-Saturated Diet is a Threat for All”), the article recognizes that everything is about balance and notes the important role potassium-rich foods play in countering salt’s negative effects. “The researchers found that while a diet hight in sodium—salt is the main source—increases your risk,” Brody writes, “even more important is the ratio of sodium (harmful) to potassium (protective) in one’s diet.” This was pointed out to me this summer by Mark Bitterman, author of a great book called Salted, and Read On »

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