sous vide instructions and recipes

YES! It’s true!  The mad genius at Polyscience, Philip Preston—creator of the anti-griddle, the smoke gun (looks like paraphernalia I used to oogle at High Times on Coventry in the 70s), and other magico creations to make cooking more fun—has sent me the latest version of the Polyscience professional immersion circulator for sous vide cooking to play with, something I am eagerly doing.  But as I already have one, there is nothing for me to do but give this sleek machine away to one lucky reader!

First, the circulator: the original now seems like a little Datsun compared to this sleek Beemer. Its design has been honed, its size has been tightened, its power enhanced. This baby operates great.

Leave a comment on how you want to use the circulator along with a working email (not to be published) and your name is in the hat. Special consideration may be given to innovative suggestions on how to use this wonderful contraption.  I haven’t decided.  Only one comment per person; anyone caught leaving multiple submissions will be forever banished.

For those who are unclear about what this thing is or does: An immersion circulator is a high tech piece of equipment that heats water to exact temperatures and circulates it so that the temperature surrounding the vacuum sealed food is constant (sous vide = vacuum sealed). This allows you to cook meat to say, exactly 132 degrees F., and keep it there till you need it. It allows you to cook short ribs for three days at 137 degrees F./58 degrees C., long enough to melt the tough connective tissue and make them tender, but at a temperature that keeps them medium rare.

It’s an amazing machine and it’s quickly working its way from the professional kitchen to the home kitchen.  If there were any doubt that sous vide cooking has gone mainstream, my local Williams Sonoma at La Place in Beachwood, Ohio, said they had four available when I called them up.  Yes, Williams Sonoma carries the immersion circulator.

I first began studying sous vide cooking while writing the book Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide, with chefs Thomas Keller, Jonathan Benno and Corey Lee.  Much of this material, the basics of sous vide cooking along with home cook friendly recipes and a thorough discussion of safety issues, has been published in a stylish spiral bound book (cover above), that comes with the machine, along with a DVD, temperature chart and instruction manual.  (Full disclosure: because I wrote the material sous vide manual, I receive some royalties for it; it is only available with the machine, alas.)

There are other machines out there that do similar tasks. The Sous Vide Supreme, a countertop appliance, was built with the home cook in mind.  Plus side: It works as advertised and it’s considerably less expensive; on the negative side, you’re limited by the 9 x 12 x 7-inch box, and it takes up substantial counterspace.  I know some people have figured out how to jury-rig a rice cooker to cook sous vide (recommended for tinkering geeks, but not for most cooks).

The Polyscience Immersion Circulator is a serious professional machine, portable and powerful.  I’ve just been using a stock pot, but this will keep a big Lexan tub of water exaclty heated. I highly recommend it for restaurant kitchens. If you are a committed home cook and have the scratch ($799) and want to make sous vide a part of your routine, then I recommend it as well. It’s a great machine. (More company pix on flickr.)

And the one I’m using (above, photo by Donna, cooking last night’s London Broil cut) could be yours! Leave a comment and you’re in the running.  I’ll announce the winner on Tuesday at noon, Eastern time.

“Small Print”: Please only one entry per person, we’ll be checking, and yes, you can game the system but you probably won’t win and you’ll risk bad karma for years to come. I will cover shipping in the US, but a shipping and handling fee will be required for shipping to Canada.  I cannot ship to other countries (it’s too much of a headache, sorry). And last, personal friends and family are not eligible.

As always, happy cooking!

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1,675 Wonderful responses to “GIVEAWAY! Sous Vide Immersion Circulator”

  • Jeff Dalton

    I would create a re-invented “Green eggs and ham”. The egg is separated, the white whipped into stiff peaks and mixed with spinach puree. It is then re-molded back into an egg with the raw yolk in the middle and cooked sous vide at 70 C for 20 minutes. Finished briefly in the oven until the outside is crispy and inside is still runny. Served with home-cured pork belly cooked sous vide in lard and crisped with a blow torch.

  • Stephen Cohen

    The circulator will add efficiency and elegance to my six-course new year’s eve dinner for 10, which won’t only have 10 adults but three children under 18 months. The more advance work we can do while still serving incredible food, the better. All that, and I think sous vide is generally fascinating.

  • Troy Banks

    I’d love this tool. I’ve already dreamily looked at it at my Williams and Sonoma last month, but $799 is too high for me. I am a ever expanding home cook and would love to cook with this. My first endevour would probably be short ribs or a nice beef cooked to a perfect medium rare. Then I’d love to try for the 62 degree egg. This would be the perfect christmas present. Merry Christmas Ruhlman.

  • tiptup

    oh my my. we have similar baths at work (scientist, not chef) and seriously considered cooking some salmon but that would break a litany of rules. first up would be eggs followed by fish followed by steak. nom nom nom

  • Andy Burns

    I’d love to get my hands on one of these, and it’s a completely selfish reason: I need to teach my wife and her family that eating “Well-done” meat should be a sin. I’ve cooked it to medium for them, and with this, I think I can finally convince them to try medium-rare (by pointing out the EXACT temperature of the meat while it’s cooking).

    Thanks!

  • Tam

    How fun – I’d like to try out one of these! I’d love to try doing different Vietnamese dishes in it just to see what happens!

  • Alex Fortney

    I’ll be picking up my beef share in about a week and while I should love my slow cooker, I don’t. Every time I leave it unattended I come back to something not quite as gloriously tender as I envisioned it. I’ve always wanted to try sous vide and I have almost #200 pounds of grass fed beef to experiment with!

  • David S

    I’ve been looking at getting one but mortgage payments seem more important at the moment. Having both in hand would be great.

  • James Gordon

    Besides using the immersion circulator for cooking the perfect egg, I’d love to be able to cook some of the recipes from The French Laundry Cookbook.

  • Wilbur Cox Jr.

    I would love to have a circulator at my house for further research and development. I use one at work, but due to company guidelines I am unable to take it off property. This would help further my career and allow me to experiment in my off time. Happy cooking friend.

  • Carl D

    I’d love to start experimenting with short ribs, steaks and fish, but especially pork!

  • Phoenix Kasten

    I would love to use this device in my latest foray into sausage-making. After reading Charcuterie, I have had inordinately too much fun with making different varieties and unique sausages. My favorite to date would be “Thanksgiving”: turkey, fatty pork belly, sage and cranberry. The immersion circulator would help me create my next idea. My vision is kind of like a mini tureen in tube form. Spicy pork, inside a Garlic/Wine, inside a creamy outer shell. It would look like a bullseye. I would use the immersion circulator to poach my new creations without overcooking and breaking of the emulsified sausages.

  • stephen ullrich

    OMG. This is on my christmas list. I’m in Sir thanks for the generosity.

  • Pamela

    What a way cool tool to have! I would do a lot of experimenting! What I have read about them sure makes them sound like a ‘wonder’ device’

    Happy Holidays!

  • Erica

    I have been DYING to try cooking sous-vide, ever since I saw Grant Achatz do a turkey a few years ago. I would love for this technique to become a regular in my repertoire…so simple and clean but with fantastic results. Thank you for your generous offer!

  • Jim M

    Two things:

    This would allow me to finally cook some of the recipes in Keller’s book, which a friend gave to me as a birthday present not knowing the specialized equipment necessary (just that I was a big fan of Keller and it was the only one of his cookbooks that I didn’t yet own).

    Secondly, this would be another thing I could use to continue teaching my young daughter that imagination and fearlessness (and access to the necessary equipment) are the only things limiting what can be accomplished by the home cook.

  • John

    I’m thinking some BBQ type items like ribs… Oh, I could really go for some slow cooked ribs right now.

  • Jessy

    Short ribs! One of my favorite foods and the very first thing I would make with an immersion circulator! Though the list would be outrageously long… I have to do things out completely!

  • Jessica

    I cook for an extremely picky eater and this would do wonders for me getting the meat just right!

  • salamooch

    First order of business would be to fine tune the lamb shoulder I use for my Lamb Pot Pie (w Harukei Turnips and my friends’ tiny carrots)…I serve that w Romaine Hearts dressed in a Sherry Vinaigrette. Simple. Slammin. Me Love Sous Vide.

  • jaybee

    Please enter me in this drawing. I’m on board for the short ribs — or any meat that would benefit from this kind of long, slow cooking. Am I the only one who drools at the words “melt the tough connective tissue”?

  • Eben Altmann

    I just found a source for pig’s blood. I’d love to use it to cook the boudin noir I’ll soon be making.

  • Johnymac2

    I’d like to try making candy. The sugers in making candy have to be at specific temps at specific times for specific durations, and I think I can get the Sous Vide to help with making some honey candy. (I’m a beekeeper and chef)

  • Arthur Lupkowski

    I would love this machine so I can really put Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide to use the proper way. Thank you for the opportunity to acquire this tool.

  • Josh Dorfman

    Dear Chef Ruhlman:

    This is a great cooking tool, and a solution I’ve been looking for!

    I’ve been thinking about my new business, a company that delivers prepackaged, healthy meals to customers around the country, but I hated the microwave route. (Restaurant Depot testing has been extensive!)

    This machine would make the reheating process into a simple process! No need to mess with power setting on a microwave, or get that soggy, nasty result. Sous Vide to the rescue.

    I wonder what it would cost to have each member rent one of these devices…

    Select me for this give-away and watch my budding business grow!

    Thanks for your consideration!

  • Tori

    I am so eager to try one of these! I would use it to cook lots of local meats, perhaps even Christmas Eve dinner, which for the first time, is at my house this year. Best of all, my boyfriend is a scientist, and has never been really into cooking. But we now cook together, and he is an eager and apt sous chef and is excited to learn more techniques. I find that explaining the science of cooking really helps him understand and enjoy what we’re doing in the kitchen. I can think of very few things that would excite him more than learning to cook using this awesome machine!

  • Janice

    I would cook my family’s favorite new dish Salmon marinated in asian marinate.

  • A.J. Voytko

    I would love to have this machine. I can just taste the coffee and porter braised short ribs that I would cook for 4 days at 138F. I have tried to do it before without a circulator and its almost impossible. Thanks for the opportunity!!!!!!

  • Luke

    I don’t have anything especially complex in mind at first, but I’d like to ramp things up as I get better at it. I’d love to start with steaks and chops, then maybe move to something with more connective tissue.

  • Steve

    I’d be very excited to have an Immersion Circulator in my kitchen! Besides all of the great food I could prepare, just imagine how geeky it would look on the countertop! 🙂

  • Bekgirl

    I would gift the immersion circulator to my sweet husband who is a professional chef. He has had to make some sacrifices lately in his career and I would love to provide him with the tools to create and inspire him back to the amazing level I know his soul craves. Plus, I would reap the rewards of his tantalizing creations!

  • Perry Hicks

    I saw this once and I’m dying to try it….burgers sous-vide to a perfect rare in a bath of butter, then plopped on the griddle for a quick sear. Damn, that just made me really hungry.

  • Andrew

    I’d give it to my brother, who has a freezer full of elk meat, that he hunted this past October in Jackson, WY. Elk is very lean, and notoriously dry if in the least bit overcooked, and this is exactly what he needs to honor the animal he killed, to enjoy it most fully.

  • Heather

    I’d give it to our son (the future chef and food truck owner) so he can make us some dinner! Hopefully some ribs or a nice brisket. ^_^

  • Tim Bereika

    We have this exact machine in the kitchen at work so I am very familiar with it’s excellent craftsmanship, precise control of heat and ease of use. As much as I’d love one for the house $800 isn’t in my family’s budget. I work long hours and am rarely home at night to prepare dinner for my wife and 18 month old son and I think the quality of the food they consume suffers because of it. My wife has her hands full with the little one as well as handling her own business (she’s self employed) so spending the time to prepare a quality meal for dinner gets little attention. The PolyScience Sous Vise Professional would make it effortless to prepare a nutritious, well ballanced, perfectly cook meal using a “one pot cooking” method. I’d be able to prep meals ahead of time and vacuum seal them. Then my wife could turn the machine on, let it reach a desired temperature and drop dinner into the water. Winning one of these machines would help my family tremendously.

  • Kalun Lee

    I’d like to try making Hainanese chicken in it. See if I can infuse the dipping oil into the chicken.

  • Hayden

    I would be able to do enough ahead of time to not have my wife do all the dinner cooking – and she won’t starve waiting for me to cook once I get home from work!

  • Melissa

    My husband and I have been experimenting with pineapple and gelatin, learning exactly what it takes to denature the pineapple enzymes so that gelatin will set. This would help us immensely with that process, as it’s more precise than a pot on the stove.

  • Cat

    Sous vide eggs! I love warm runny yolks. I would have to make every egg variation possible before I moved on to meats. Breakfast sous vide every day. Yuuummmm

  • Evan D.

    I recently purchased a programmable rice cooker for having at least part of my dinner ready when I get home from work. An immersion circulator would make the perfect addition so I can do as much of my prep/cooking ahead of time to ensure there’s a great dinner waiting when I get home.

    The first thing I would cook is lamb chops which have a small window of perfection to make sure it’s the correct temp inside. A quick finish in the pan or under the broiler and I’m a happy camper.

    Thanks for the chance to win! Lots of blogging about what I make with the sous-vide machine would follow, of course

  • Shaphan Markelon

    I am a candidate for an instructor position at NECI. Needless to say it would be pretty bad ass to have one of these set up in my classroom/kitchen!!

  • Betty Devine

    Nothing ventured, nothing won?? As a home cook who loves messing about in the kitchen, I am certainly not the most qualified person in this group of hopefuls… but I want this as badly as everyone else! I am most interested in doing meat/seafood preparation SV, both for our usual meals for two as well as the big family dinners for 30 plus which far outstrip my kitchen’s ovenpower. (as a plus, I have enjoyed reading the ideas in these comment)

  • Brian

    I make a lot of ice creams. I would cook my base at 82.5 C until everything is nice and ready and can coat the back of a spoon. That way I’ll never have curdled eggs that I’ll have to strain out.

  • Mattias Morrison

    Aside from cooking our farm’s fantastic cuts of meat and veggies to perfection, my innovative use could be precise rewarming of frostbitten feet/hands! I’m a wilderness guide by profession.

  • Vertie

    Can’t think of a better way to prep some foods for my 9-month-old! may also be delicious for his parents.

  • Christian Donovan

    I could finally put my samples of transglutaminase as well as the alinea, fat duck, and under pressure cookbooks to good use.

  • Marty steinke

    I have tried so many ways to Jerry-rig a sous vide system and every time it’s such a pain in the ass fraught with lots of monitoring the temperature. I must say that I have enjoyed some great results. The perfect cooked egg, wonderful 12 hour trotters, creamy sweetbreads, really flavorful headcheese and tender artichokes. I would love to take my sousvide cooking to the next level. There are so many possibilities I can’t wait!!!

  • Brady Vickers

    Wow, so many things are possible. But the never-ending pursuit of the perfect “roast chicken” (via the Bionic Turkey technique of Dave Arnold’s) would be my first project.

  • Lexie

    I would like to experiment with tough cuts of meat, and this will encourage me to put the idea of using ‘the whole animal’ into practice.
    Thank you Michael, you are very generous.

  • Fred M

    In life – as in cooking – nothing ventured, nothing gained. I WANT this immersion circulator! I may actually NEED it. Like a child on Christmas Eve, I have visions dancing in my head…but rather than sugar plums, I see souse vide pork belly. I just might not sleep tonight.

  • Paul

    I don’t eat seafood, but I’d love to poach a lobster in butter for my wife.

  • Hunter M

    I would use this piece of equipment to perfectly cook eggs, vegetables, and of course pieces of meat and fish.

  • Jack A.

    I’d have the only one on my island, so first and foremost, I’d call up all the other chefs and mock them mercilessly. Then I’d eat even more eggs than I do now.

  • Eric

    I’ve always been fascinated by sous vide, but have never had the opportunity to use the machinery. The first thought that comes to my mind is slow cooking every cut of meat imaginable. Roast beef, lamb shank, short ribs, venison back strap. After that, exploring the possibility of curing meats. That might be completely crazy, but I think its worth a shot.

  • Kimberly D

    I am very excited to give it a try! I would cook meats, fish and vegetables. It would be an especially cool technique to teach my almost 2 year old. I work in the science field so this technique is just very exciting for me.

  • David Pearl

    If gifted the immersion circulator, I and several friends would make it a fixture in our annual Festivus party here in Cleveland (among other uses throughout the year). And of course we’d invite you and a guest to attend… here’s our invitation this year:

    Friends, friends – it’s time for Festivus!

    Yes, our version of the Seinfeldian Holiday. Here’s a brief history of our tradition:

    2005 and 2006 were gourmet feasts served way late to 15-20 family and close friends at my parents’ house.

    In 2007 Tom turned us loose in his live/work space called “the Base.” We served about 45, played a rousing ol’ match of Snapdragons (an oft-forgotten parlor trick of which Shakespeare wrote), had a 15-foot pole assembled by a disheveled white-haired man (my ~godfather), and saw who could hold up two folding chairs the longest in Feats of Strength. I played a 100-song soundtrack of my favorites of 2007 (which we gave away on mp3 CD), while Tom created a video. And the Festivus Miracle, you ask? Well, all that happened and as I recall the food still came out pretty decent.

    So, this year Festivus is back – on account of our good friend Brian, who’s lending his kitchen and house in Tremont for the December 23rd holiday. Aaron, who has since gone to CIA and cooked at Per Se, is head chef. I’m helping Aaron coordinate while cooking up a new soundtrack. And TK is going to be involved, somehow.

    Starting at 7:30pm, we’re planning a series of canapés (I guess that’s Aaron’s fancy word for gourmet finger foods).

    We’re asking that folks bring wine, seasonal beer, or other beverages to help defray our costs.

    There will be an aluminum pole, but feel free to bring your own. NO TINSEL PLEASE, it’s distracting.

    Parking will be on the street – grievances on this will be accepted but not expected.

    We have limited space and will want an accurate headcount, so please RSVP by THIS FRIDAY, December 17th. And please RSVP “yes,” because we don’t want to make an already-long list of grievances even longer…

  • Adam

    i already have been cooking sous vide without an immersion circulator, so having one would make things way easier. duck confit, olive oil poached fish, green tea poached fennel, duck fat sunchokes. i have been using pots of water on the stove and the rationale at work to do these things and would appreciate an immersion circulator.

  • Nathan W

    As a young culinary professional, I dream every day of a benevolent higher-up doing the same thing you are: giving away the surplus tools we slave labor are only allowed to make magic with on the clock. I would love to bring sous vide precision home, to be able to enjoy the fruits of the machine as much as our guests in the restaurant. It would really make me happy to recreate what I’ve been taught and have the freedom to explore the technology further.

  • sam rosener

    Since Thanksgiving at the in-laws was a bust (canned green beans in canned gloop, etc), I’d use it to recreate the Achatz/Kokonas Thanksgiving in a bag from a few years back.

  • Kenneth Lee Foon

    I would use it to begin exploring the great possibilities of tough cuts of beef and pork along with long low temperatures.

    And now for the creative part of my submission 🙂

    ** ** ** **

    ‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house

    The sous-vide was stirring, quiet as a mouse;

    The vac-paks were hung in the water with care,

    In hopes that the Ruhlman soon would be there;

    The stages were nestled all snug in their beds,

    While visions of mise-en-place danced in their head;

    And mamma in her ‘kerchief, and I in my cap,

    Had just settled down for a long winter’s nap,

    When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter,

    I sprang from the prep table to see what was the matter.

    Away to the window I flew like a flash,

    Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash.

    The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow

    Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below,

    When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,

    But a miniature volkswagon, and eight tiny sous chefs,

    With a paunchy old driver, waving an opener and can,

    I knew in a moment it must be Michael Ruhlman.

    More rapid than vitapreps his sous-chefs they came,

    And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name;

    “Now, Bourdain! now, Keller! now, Delgrosso and Pardus!

    On, Symon! on Ripert! on, Donna, and Kelly!

    To the top of the porch! to the top of the wall!

    Now dash away! dash away! dash away all!”

    As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly,

    When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky,

    So up to the house-top the sous-chefs they flew,

    With the sleigh full of goodies, and Michael Ruhlman too.

    And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the roof

    The prancing and pawing of each little clogged foot.

    As I drew in my head, and was turning around,

    Down the chimney that Ruhlman he came with a bound.

    He was dressed all in checks, from his head to his foot,

    And his apron was tarnished with gravy and soot;

    A bundle of signed books he had flung on his back,

    And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack.

    His eyes — how they twinkled! his dimples how merry!

    His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry!

    His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,

    And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow;

    The stump of a cigar he held tight in his teeth,

    And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath;

    He had a long face and a paunch little belly,

    That shook, when he laughed like a bowlful of jelly.

    He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf,

    And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself;

    A wink of his eye and a twist of his head,

    Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread;

    He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work,

    And filled all the stockings; then turned with a jerk,

    And smelling the stock with deep whiffs of his nose,

    He gave me a nod then up the chimney he rose;

    He sprang to his volkswagon, to his team gave a whistle,

    And away they all flew like the down of a thistle.

    But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight,

    “Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good-night.”

  • Kenneth Lee Foon

    I would use it to begin exploring the great possibilities of tough cuts of beef and pork along with long low temperatures.

    And now for the creative part of my submission 🙂

    ** ** ** **

    ‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house
    The sous-vide was stirring, quiet as a mouse;
    The vac-paks were hung in the water with care,
    In hopes that the Ruhlman soon would be there;
    The stages were nestled all snug in their beds,
    While visions of mise-en-place danced in their head;
    And mamma in her ‘kerchief, and I in my cap,
    Had just settled down for a long winter’s nap,
    When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter,
    I sprang from the prep table to see what was the matter.
    Away to the window I flew like a flash,
    Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash.
    The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow
    Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below,
    When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,
    But a miniature volkswagon, and eight tiny sous chefs,
    With a paunchy old driver, waving an opener and can,
    I knew in a moment it must be Michael Ruhlman.
    More rapid than vitapreps his sous-chefs they came,
    And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name;
    “Now, Bourdain! now, Keller! now, Delgrosso and Pardus!
    On, Symon! on Ripert! on, Donna, and Kelly!
    To the top of the porch! to the top of the wall!
    Now dash away! dash away! dash away all!”
    As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly,
    When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky,
    So up to the house-top the sous-chefs they flew,
    With the sleigh full of goodies, and Michael Ruhlman too.
    And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the roof
    The prancing and pawing of each little clogged foot.
    As I drew in my head, and was turning around,
    Down the chimney that Ruhlman he came with a bound.
    He was dressed all in checks, from his head to his foot,
    And his apron was tarnished with gravy and soot;
    A bundle of signed books he had flung on his back,
    And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack.
    His eyes — how they twinkled! his dimples how merry!
    His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry!
    His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
    And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow;
    The stump of a cigar he held tight in his teeth,
    And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath;
    He had a long face and a paunch little belly,
    That shook, when he laughed like a bowlful of jelly.
    He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf,
    And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself;
    A wink of his eye and a twist of his head,
    Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread;
    He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work,
    And filled all the stockings; then turned with a jerk,
    And smelling the stock with deep whiffs of his nose,
    He gave me a nod then up the chimney he rose;
    He sprang to his volkswagon, to his team gave a whistle,
    And away they all flew like the down of a thistle.
    But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight,
    “Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good-night.”

  • Joel

    I just went to a wild game hunt & cooking class last week & I have a couple of racks of venison and a whole wild boar saddle looking for a home on a plate. The venison will get sous vide to medium rare finished on the grill over pecan. The boar saddle would get a little lard added to make a confit, then seared on a hot pan to crisp the thin layer of backfat.

  • Kim S

    As a culinary student, I would be the talk of the class. The things we could experiment with!

  • Snow

    Perfectly cooked fish of all varieties!
    Also great for pasteurizing eggs, making yogurt, and other low temp applications. I want one!!

  • Ron

    I have wanted a Sous Vide Supreme for over a year now but do not have the counter space. This would be ideal!!

  • Ian Rucker

    My eventual father-in-law is an excellent “home” chef, with lots of disposable income to waste on kitchen gadgets and such. Most of the nice kitchen implements that I own are hand-me-downs from him, and I would love to wow him with an implement we have just spoke about in passing. Sous Vide Envy as it were! That and I have been tasked by most of my family to produce food above and beyond what they are used to for holiday dinners… I’d love to see what this can do with a lean piece of bottom round.

  • kim

    oh man! i know this doesn’t win points in the “creative” arena, but just your writing about short ribs has my mouth watering!

  • Kathrine

    I would give this to my husband, who uses our crockpot to sous vide all sorts of things. Having the real deal would make him very happy. We are having sous vide steaks tomorrow night for dinner!

  • Miguel Marino

    Well, I never seem to win at these things. Let’s hope this is the first one ever. I can imagine all the wonderful meat that will pass through this gizmo. Mmmmmmm.

  • Jonathan Power

    I’d use the immersion circulator to help open my own small restaurant. One more piece in the puzzle of delivering great food.

  • LESLIE SCOTT

    I just checked back to read all the other comments since I posted one ate last week and was dismayed to see my comment had disappeared. (Perhaps because I had mentioned 2 stores by name?) I’ll leave my comment again as them men in my life could benefit greatly from this marvelous tool. My husband’s cheap cuts and freezer full of venison would taste better and our son, who likes to spend money he doesn’t have, would learn that it is possible to eat well on less!

  • Grover

    I have used a Sous Vide Supreme for one year now and would love to take it to the next level. I like 63.5C soft boiled eggs and making out of this world easy apple sauce sous vide for my baby.

  • TONY

    Sounds like a wonderful invention…would love to have one.
    I would christen it by injecting lamb shanks with a wine(port or a pinot grigio, etc)-garlic-rosemary marinated, before sealing the bag! Tender, medium rare and flavorful!
    PS: they are available for about $450 at a few retailers, like Sur la Table and Amazon.

  • Bill Martin

    As a geeky in all directions guy, with a girlfriend in culinary school, what *wouldn’t* I do with one of these? I wonder if you sous vide barley for homebrew? Hmm…

  • Frank

    A Sous Vide Immersion Circulator: can you think of a better way to utilise a whole beast from nose to tail! Pig’s tails, trotters, sweetbreads, slow-coooked tongue, beef and pork cheeks, brain, pig-head pseudo-pancetta, and on and on.

    Can you think of a better way to put a sous vide immersion circulator to good use?….I didn’t think so.

    P.S. Not really offal, but did I mention pork belly?

  • Dave R

    I’ve made a couple of attempts cooking sous vide on the stove top with mixed results. I’d love to revisit the technique using this machine.

  • Michael

    First I’d re-create a meat course I had at Le Chateaubriand in Paris a couple years ago. Beef cut into the exact shape of a filet mignon, but actually being from the short rib or round, and still pink inside due to the controlled low hear magic of sous-vide. Served with baby carrots, and potatoes (which may also have been cooked sous vide), it blew my mind when I had it. I was dining solo, and got some funny looks from the French dinners when I started laughing out loud after I got the joke/point of the dish.

    Next up would be a re-invention of the cassoulet I make a couple times a year. I think almost every component (duck leg, pork belly, garlic sausage, beans) could be cooked sous vide separately, then browned and layered into the cassoulet pot for final cooking and melding of the flavors. The (Bourdain inspired) puree of browned onion, garlic, with duck fat would be a separate non-sous vide item. And, the crackling garnish might still require a sheet pan with a lot of parchment.